Allergies

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    The main culprit for allergies is pollen. Most allergies that patients experience tend to be around spring when pollen is released by trees, grass and flowers blooming. Pollen is considered a foreign attacker to your body, so your immune system kicks into high gear and tries to protect the body by releasing antibodies and histamines to fight it off. Even though histamines are trying to protect you, they are what cause the allergy symptoms you try to fight.
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    As the weather warms up and flowers begin to bloom, you may experience the familiar sneezing, congestion and watery eyes of seasonal allergies. This spring, use these three tips to stop allergies in their tracks:
    1. Shower before bed. Pesky pollen can cling to your hair and skin and keep your body’s allergic response going all night.
    2. Limit your exposure. Avoid going outside during the middle of the day and afternoon, when pollen counts are highest. Keep doors and windows closed, and don’t drive with the windows down in your car.
    3. Medicate to alleviate. Non-drowsy allergy medications are available over the counter to relieve your suffering. Never start a new medication without talking to your doctor. He or she may also recommend immunotherapy (allergy shots) for severe allergies.
    Trinity Health recognizes that people seek medical information on a variety of topics for a variety of reasons. Trinity Health does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. As a Catholic health care organization, Trinity Health acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition.

    Please note, the information contained on this website is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider if you have questions regarding your medical condition or before starting any new treatment. In the event of a medical emergency, always call 911 or proceed to your nearest emergency care facility.
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    A drug allergy is a group of symptoms that occur when your body is exposed to a drug to which it has developed a sensitivity. That sensitivity causes your body's immune system to overreact to the drug. A drug allergy may not happen the first time you take a medication, but if you take the drug again, your body's immune system may cause the release of antibodies or certain immune chemicals that can cause symptoms.
     
     Common symptoms of allergies to drugs may include:
    •  hives
    •  skin and/or eye itching
    •  skin rash
    •  swelling of the lips, tongue or face
    •  wheezing
    Less commonly, a life-threatening reaction called anaphylaxis can occur. Symptoms of anaphylaxis may include:
    •  abdominal pain or cramping
    •  nausea, vomiting and/or diarrhea
    •  confusion
    •  dizziness, fainting, lightheadedness
    •  difficulty breathing
    •  rapid pulse
    •  heart palpitations
    Certain types of medicines are more likely to cause allergic reactions than others. According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology, those drugs include:
    •  antibiotics
    •  chemotherapy medicines
    •  aspirin and non-steroidal antiinflammatory drugs(NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen
    • anticonvulsants
    • monoclonal antibodies
    Be sure to discuss with your doctor any adverse effect to a drug that you experience. You may need to avoid exposure to the drug in the future, and possibly even wear a bracelet that could tell an emergency physican you are allergic to the drug.
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    If you know you're allergic to bees, you should always have an epinephrine pen on hand. You can get a prescription for this from your doctor. If you don't have an epinephrine pen, you may take Benadryl. But you should also see a healthcare professional as soon as possible. Bee stings can be serious for people who are allergic to them. 
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    Maybe outdoor exercising sounds lovely to you, but you're worried that being in nature will trigger your allergies, asthma or other breathing problems. Talk with your healthcare provider about coordinating your activity interests with your health condition. Then consider these suggestions to help make exercising outdoors like a breath of fresh air for your body and spirits:
    • If you have asthma, use your medications before exercising, in the manner prescribed by your doctor. Do a five- to 10-minute warm-up. With the right treatment and management plan, people with exercise-induced asthma can participate safely in exercise.
    • Walking is a good exercise choice over activities that cause you to breathe faster, such as running or soccer.
    • Higher ozone and pollutant levels can cause breathing problems, so check levels before exercising outdoors. Many online and print weather forecasts now report air quality levels: 0 to 50 is good; 50 to 100 is not harmful, but could cause breathing problems for some people with asthma; above 100 is unhealthy if you have lung or heart disease and other conditions; above 150 is unhealthy for everyone.
    • Exercise in the early morning or early evening, when pollution levels are lower.
    • If you have breathing problems, avoid exercising outdoors in very cold weather.
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    A , Pediatrics, answered
    Is There a Relationship Between Eczema and Allergies?
    Allergies and eczema tend to run in families, so if parents have a history then children are a lot more likely to be affected. In this video, I will discusse ways to control symptoms.
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    What is Skeeter syndrome?

    Skeeter syndrome is an allergic reaction to the protein in a mosquito's saliva, which makes the bites even more red and inflamed. Watch as allergist Clifford Bassett, MD, discusses how to treat these bites, and how to test for a mosquito allergy.

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    It's very important to alert others about allergies, especially if they are severe and life-threatening (for example, you have difficulty breathing if you come into contact with the particular agent). Medical alert tags are the easiest way to alert others to your allergy, especially if you are unable to do so yourself for some reason. It's important to keep in mind instances when you could potentially be exposed to your allergen, as well, like eating at a restaurant that may have peanuts in the food, and you should always alert your waiter and others to your allergy.
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    Anaphylaxis is defined as a serious allergic reaction that is rapid in onset and may cause death. It must be quickly determined and treated to avoid a life-threatening situation. Death from anaphylaxis usually results from choking due to upper airway swelling or from breathing failure due to lung obstruction and, less commonly, from heart failure. Epinephrine must be administered when signs and symptoms of anaphylaxis appear to be life-threatening.
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    Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency requiring immediate help. 911 should be called immediately, as rapid treatment is essential in preventing further damage from the anaphylactic reaction. Treatment is highly effective especially if administered early.