Allergies

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    Most drug allergies don't require treatment because they result in mild reactions that will resolve by simply not taking the medicine anymore. In this case, you must work with the medical team in order to find an alternative treatment. More severe reactions may require medical or supportive therapy at a hospital.
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    During an anaphylactic reaction an allergic response occurs to the trigger that a person is exposed to, and a protein called histamine is released from different tissues in the body. This quickly causes the symptoms of anaphylaxis including hives, swelling, dilated blood vessels with a drop in blood pressure, nausea, vomiting, and difficulty breathing. This is a life-threatening emergency that requires immediate medical attention. 
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    They should identify and avoid their allergens and carry medication to reverse the allergic reaction.

    People who have severe allergic reactions can also wear a medical identification (ID) tag, bracelet or necklace.
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    There is no specific test to predict the likelihood of anaphylaxis, although testing may provide some guidance as to the severity of the allergy. Experts advise those who are susceptible to anaphylaxis to carry medication, such as injectable epinephrine, at all times, and to check the medicine's expiration date regularly.
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    A , Dermatology, answered

    Many medications can cause photosensitivity in some people. The photoreaction can mimic a sunburn or bring on an allergic reaction such as hives or a rash. Be sure to check with your pharmacist or doctor about what sun-related side effects your medications could give you. Antibiotics such as tetracycline and sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim), some diuretics and antihistamines (such as Benadryl), nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (Feldene, Naproxen, Motrin), and some antidepressants can be phototoxic after exposure to UV light. Researchers have found that taking these drugs also increases the risk of skin cancer if you are exposed to the sun. It's easier to control the use of topical products because they are not essential to maintaining your health. Retinoids such as Retin-A, any AHA, even facial scrubs - anything that exfoliates the top layer of your skin - will make you more vulnerable to the elements. You should probably stop using any of them one week before going on a beach vacation. If the stratum corneum doesn't have that dead keratinocyte barrier on top of it, you're setting the skin up for irritation by salt water, chlorine, wind, and most of all the sun.

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    A Allergy & Immunology, answered on behalf of
    What Causes Anaphylaxis?
    Anaphylaxis has many different triggers, from insect stings to environmental factors to food allergies. Learn more from Adhuna Mathuria, MD, from StoneSprings Hospital Center in this video.
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    Unexpected allergic reactions to drugs are rare, but symptoms can be severe, ranging from fever to skin rashes and hives, and anaphylaxis, a severe and potentially life-threatening reaction that includes swelling of the tongue and mouth, difficulty breathing, rapid heartbeat, a dramatic drop in blood pressure, unconsciousness, and possibly even death.

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    A Allergy & Immunology, answered on behalf of
    What Are Symptoms of Anaphylaxis (Anaphylactic Shock)?
    Anaphylaxis can affect any organ system, but most commonly the skin and digestive tract. Learn more from Adhuna Mathuria, MD, from StoneSprings Hospital Center in this video.
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    A Allergy & Immunology, answered on behalf of
    How Is Anaphylaxis Treated?
    Anaphylaxis is treated with an EpiPen, steroids or antihistamines, says Adhuna Mathuria, MD, from StoneSprings Hospital Center. Learn more in this video.
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    Anaphylaxis is a potentially life-threatening medical emergency requiring immediate help. 911 should be called immediately, as rapid treatment is essential in preventing further damage from the anaphylactic reaction. Treatment is highly effective especially if administered early.