Allergies

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    A answered
    Maybe outdoor exercising sounds lovely to you, but you're worried that being in nature will trigger your allergies, asthma or other breathing problems. Talk with your healthcare provider about coordinating your activity interests with your health condition. Then consider these suggestions to help make exercising outdoors like a breath of fresh air for your body and spirits:
    • If you have asthma, use your medications before exercising, in the manner prescribed by your doctor. Do a five- to 10-minute warm-up. With the right treatment and management plan, people with exercise-induced asthma can participate safely in exercise.
    • Walking is a good exercise choice over activities that cause you to breathe faster, such as running or soccer.
    • Higher ozone and pollutant levels can cause breathing problems, so check levels before exercising outdoors. Many online and print weather forecasts now report air quality levels: 0 to 50 is good; 50 to 100 is not harmful, but could cause breathing problems for some people with asthma; above 100 is unhealthy if you have lung or heart disease and other conditions; above 150 is unhealthy for everyone.
    • Exercise in the early morning or early evening, when pollution levels are lower.
    • If you have breathing problems, avoid exercising outdoors in very cold weather.
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    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    What Should I Do If I'M Allergic To Bees And Get Stung?
    If an EpiPen (epinephrine) is not available, patients should go to the emergency room for an allergic reaction to a bee sting. In this video, I will explain treatment of these allergic reactions.
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    People who know that they are severely allergic to certain substances or bee stings may wear a medical ID tag, necklace, or bracelet.
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    Call 9-1-1 or the local emergency number if the person:
    • Has trouble breathing
    • Complains of the throat tightening
    • Explains that he or she is subject to severe allergic reactions
    • Is unconscious
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    There is a relationship between eczema and allergies. Both are reactions that stimulate the production of an antibody called IgE when a person is exposed to an allergen. Eczema and allergies often run in families and can be passed from generation to generation. 
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    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
    Allergies are an overreaction of the body's natural defense system that helps fight infections (immune system).  The immune system normally protects the body from viruses and bacteria by producing antibodies to fight them.  In an allergic reaction, the immune system starts fighting substanes that are usually harmless (such as dust, mites, pollen, or a medicine) as though these substances were trying to attack the body.  This overreaction can cause a rash, itchy eyes, a runny nose, difficulty breathing, nausea and diarrhea.
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    Common allergies result when your immune system overreacts to a harmless substance, but they are not to be confused with an autoimmune disorder.

    An autoimmune disorder is a separate condition in which a person's immune system starts attacking the body's tissues. An example would be rheumatoid arthritis.
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    Unexpected allergic reactions to drugs are rare, but symptoms can be severe, ranging from fever to skin rashes and hives, and anaphylaxis, a severe and potentially life-threatening reaction that includes swelling of the tongue and mouth, difficulty breathing, rapid heartbeat, a dramatic drop in blood pressure, unconsciousness, and possibly even death.

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    A Allergy & Immunology, answered on behalf of
    Are Drug Allergies Inherited?
    Drug allergies can be inherited, but aren't always. Learn more from Adhuna Mathuria, MD, from StoneSprings Hospital Center in this video.
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    You are not going to experience an allergic reaction the first time you take a drug, but that does not mean that you are in the clear. Before you can have an allergic reaction to a drug, you need to develop antibodies to it, just as you would need to do with a food, for example. As a result, the longer or more frequently you take a drug, the greater chance you have of developing an allergy to it.