UCLA Health

Our Mission

For more than half a century, UCLA Health has provided the best in healthcare and the latest in medical technology to the people of Los Angeles and throughout the world. Comprised of Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA, Mattel Children's Hospital UCLA, and the UCLA Medical Group with its wide-reaching system of primary-care and specialty-care offices throughout the region, UCLA Health System is among the most comprehensive and advanced healthcare systems in the world. Our physicians are world leaders in the diagnosis and treatment of complex illnesses, and our hospitals are among the best in the country. Consistently ranked one of the top five hospitals in the nation and the best medical center in the western United States by U.S. News

Activity

  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    What can I do if I suspect I have a food allergy?

    Pediatric allergist Maria Garcia-Lloret, MD, co-director of UCLA’s Food Allergy Clinic, recommends that people concerned about food allergies should consult with an experienced allergist or immunologist, working in collaboration with a gastroenterologist and a dietitian, to ensure accurate diagnosis...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    Why is an annual doctor's visit important for school-age children?

    For school-age children, Eric Curcio, M.D., a general internist and pediatrician at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica, says, the annual visit is a time when the pediatrician can go through the child’s records and make sure none of the vaccines or vaccine boosters have been missed. “It’s also an opportunity to...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    How can I help my child feel less anxious about going to the doctor?

    If you detect anxiety from your child about going to the doctor, encourage him or her to tell you about the fears. Then, address their concerns using age-appropriate language. “In the exam room, children can be quite sensitive to their parents’ emotions. Having a calm, positive, reassuring attitude can reduce your child...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    What causes polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)?

    Although genetic factors are believed to make certain women more susceptible to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), Susan Davis, M.D., a UCLA endocrinologist, notes that lifestyle, including diet and exercise, plays an important role in its severity. In particular, excess weight exacerbates both the reproductive...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    How should I talk to my children about going back to school?

    “It’s important for parents to talk to their kids about going back to school and to keep the dialogue going for the first couple of weeks,” says John Piacentini, Ph.D., director of the Child, OCD, Anxiety and Tic Disorders Program at the Resnick Neuropsychiatric Hospital at UCLA. “Many parents try to make their children...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    How does caffeine affect children?

    A study in the Journal of Pediatrics found that children who consumed the most caffeine slept less than the nine hours per night recommended by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

    “When children sleep poorly, it manifests in subtle ways,” says Carlos Lerner, MD, medical director for the UCLA Childre...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    What can reduce the need for heart biopsies after heart transplant?

    Mario C. Deng, M.D., the medical director of the Advanced Heart Failure, Mechanical Circulatory Support and Heart Transplant Program at Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, is best known for having conceived and pioneered one of the seminal recent advances in heart transplantation: the first U.S. Food...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    Can the whooping cough vaccine cause health problems?

    "There are people who have misconceptions about vaccines, such as the concern that they might cause autism – a charge that has been completely disproven," explains UCLA pediatric infectious-disease specialist James Cherry, MD. Prior to 1995, there were some negative reactions to the whole-cell DTP vaccine, but the present...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    What is autism?

    Autism, also known as Autism Spectrum Disorders or ASD, is not a single disease. Instead, it refers to a group of developmental disabilities that includes a wide range of language deficits as well as emotional and social delays.

    “You can have high-functioning and low-functioning autism. And many of these...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    How is whooping cough transmitted to infants?

    Whooping cough in infants is usually transmitted from contact in the household with a family member -- most often the mother -- who has a cough illness that has not been recognized as pertussis, the bacteria that causes the illness. As UCLA pediatric infectious-disease specialist James Cherry, MD, explains, "This...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    What is an endoscope?

    An endoscope is a long fiber-optic tube with a camera and a light at its tip, along with a small channel through which gastroenterologists pass instruments into the gut to perform a variety of treatments while viewing images on a monitor. “Through the endoscope, we can now perform biopsies, cut things,...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    What are some of the concerns parents have about the HPV vaccine?

    Initially, Kellie Ernzen Kruger, M.D., internal medicine-pediatrics specialist at UCLA Medical Center, Santa Monica heard concern from some parents about the potential for their children to receive the wrong message from being given the vaccine. Administration of the vaccine is accompanied by counseling designed to...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    Why are adolescents more prone to concussions?

    Children and adolescents who play organized team sports have an increasing risk for concussion, with emergency room visits for concussions between 1997 and 2007 doubling for those aged 8-14 years and increasing even more for those aged 14-19.

    Athletes who have received a concussion are three times...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    What is macular degeneration?

    Macular degeneration, a serious condition, is characterized by a loss of central vision that often is associated with problems with reading and, in more advanced stages, difficulty recognizing faces. Macular degeneration is most common among fair-skinned, light-eyed individuals of Northern European...Read More
  • UCLA Health
    UCLA Health answered:

    What health risks might I face during international travel?

    Malaria spread by mosquitoes is a major risk in many parts of Africa, Asia and Latin America. “Although there is no vaccine against malaria, medications can be prescribed that are very effective in preventing the disease,” Zachary Rubin, MD, director of the Santa Monica-UCLA Center for Travel and Tropical...Read More