Our Mission

Swedish is the largest, most comprehensive non-profit health provider in the Greater Seattle area.  It includes five hospital campuses and Swedish Medical Group – a network of primary-care and specialty clinics.  In addition to general medical and surgical care, Swedish is known as a regional referral center, providing specialized treatment in areas such as neurological care, digestive health, cardiovascular care, orthopedics, cancer care, high-risk obstetrics, pediatric specialties, organ transplantation and clinical research.



Activity

  • Swedish
    of Swedish answered:
    For most people failing to treat GERD will result in a worsening of the symptoms and potentially to complications from the constant burning of the esophagus with acid. Most patients over time will develop a hiatal hernia or stomach herniation in which the stomach slips up through the diaphragm into the...Read More
  • Swedish
    of Swedish answered:
    Not always. Carefully monitoring the cancer and delaying treatment until and if disease progression occurs is called "active surveillance", an option particularly well suited for men with low-risk prostate cancer, elderly men or men who have other serious health conditions. Read More
  • Swedish
    Swedish posted:
    Is it old age or a memory disorder? Swedish is offering a free class on September 29 called "Taking Control of Your Brain Health." Register at http://bit.ly/R1pfji
  • Swedish
    Swedish posted:
    Is it old age or a memory disorder? Swedish is offering a free class on September 29 called "Taking Control of Your Brain Health." Register at bit.ly/R1pfji
  • Swedish
    Swedish posted:
    Swedish-affiliated physicians named top docs: http://bit.ly/U7Yx4S
  • Swedish
    of Swedish answered:
    Stage I:  The cancer is found only in the prostate. The tumor cannot be felt during a digital rectal exam (DRE) and does not show up with any imaging technology.

    Stage IIA: The tumor has grown within the prostate but has not spread outside of the prostate. It can be felt in one half of one side...Read More
  • Swedish
    of Swedish answered:
    Once prostate cancer is diagnosed, the stage of cancer needs to be determined in order to decide on the most appropriate treatment plan. Staging is the process of determining if the cancer has grown within the prostate region or if it has spread to other areas of the body.

    Three key factors are...Read More
  • Swedish
    of Swedish answered:
  • Swedish
    of Swedish answered:
  • Swedish
    of Swedish answered:
    Most men diagnosed with prostate cancer experience no symptoms and most early-stage prostate cancers are discovered during routine screening, such as a prostate-specific antigen test (PSA) or digital rectal exam (DRE).

    If the tumor becomes larger, the following symptoms may appear.
    • Frequent
    ...Read More
  • Swedish
    of Swedish answered:
    The following tests are useful for detecting prostate cancer:
    • Digital Rectal Exam (DRE): Using a gloved, lubricated finger the doctor examines the prostate to check for lumps or other abnormalities. If anything suspicious is found, additional testing may be needed. While a DRE is a useful screening
    ...Read More
  • Swedish
    of Swedish answered:
    Different chemotherapy medications destroy cancer cells by a variety of different mechanisms. Many work on the DNA of a cell to prevent it from reproducing, while others deprive cancer cells of what they need to grow. Chemotherapy may be used for prostate cancer that has spread and when hormone therapy...Read More
  • Swedish
    of Swedish answered:
    The goal of hormone therapy, which lowers levels of testosterone that causes prostate-cancer cells to grow, is sometimes to cure the cancer, such as when combined with radiation, but more often it is given to suppress the cancer and prolong survival when the cancer has advanced beyond the point where...Read More
  • Swedish
    of Swedish answered:
    Not always. Carefully monitoring the cancer and delaying treatment until and if disease progression occurs is called "active surveillance", an option particularly well suited for men with low-risk prostate cancer, elderly men or men who have other serious health conditions. Read More
  • Swedish
    Swedish posted:
    Parkinson's Disease Forum August 30, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Swedish/Cherry Hill. Presentations from a neurologist, neurosurgeon, physical therapist and neuropsychiatrist. Free, but pre-registration required. Call Michelle Bauer at 206.320.2883 to register.