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**The content provided on this site by Johns Hopkins Medicine is for educational and informational purposes only. For medical advice and diagnosis, please see your personal healthcare provider.**



Activity

  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    What are the treatments for superficial bladder cancer?

    The majority of bladder cancers arise from the lining of the bladder. Over 75 percent of these tumors remain confined to the lining layer and do not invade into the bladder wall. These tumors are called superficial transitional cell cancers. Advanced bladder cancer is cancer which has invaded into...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    Is caffeine bad for me?

    Caffeine is the most commonly used drug. Caffeine can be found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate and some medicines. Approximately 80 percent of people worldwide use caffeine on a daily basis, with 90 percent of that being through coffee or tea consumption. Increasingly popular energy drinks,...Read More
  • Dr. Rachel Marie E. Salas, MD - Baltimore, MD - Neurology

    What alternative treatments can help me fall asleep?

    The following treatments can help you fall asleep:
    • Herbal treatments: While more research is needed to determine the safety and effectiveness of these treatments, valerian root, a herb with mild sedative effects, is said to help with sleep onset and maintenance. Chamomile, passion flower, ginseng, and lemon balm,
    ...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    How do I prepare for endoscopic sinus surgery?

    Before surgery, your doctor may prescribe some medications that help reduce inflammation. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully and take these medications at the appropriate times. Your surgeon will also require you to get medical clearance from your primary care physician before surgery. Make...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    What are some types of intra-arterial therapy for treating liver cancer?

    Specific types of intra-arterial therapy include transarterial chemo embolization (TACE), drug-eluting beads and Yttrium-90 microspheres. Using the TACE procedure, your doctor delivers chemotherapy directly to the tumor, which spares you from experiencing many of the traditional side effects of c...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    What should I expect right after my eyelid or browlift surgery?

    After the surgery, your doctor will tell you that you can expect certain typical reactions:
    • Pain and fatigue -- You are likely to have some pain, swelling, and bruising after the procedure, and feel very tired. Your doctor will give you a prescription for pain medicine.
    • Nausea and vomiting --
    ...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    How can psychological counseling enhance my breast cancer treatment?

    There are a variety of psychotherapy options available to help ease the emotional difficulties breast cancer patients often face. A counseling option known as integrative psychotherapy is an approach to healing that seeks to increase your resilience and personal strength. It incorporates the fund

    ...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    What complications can result from a liver transplant?

    Whether it is from a deceased or living donor, a liver transplant is a demanding and complex surgery with the potential for serious, life-threatening complications. Before you or your child have a transplant, you should be fully aware of the risks like:
    • Biliary Leaks – Patients with reduced size
    ...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    Can Zika virus be transmitted sexually?

    There is evidence that Zika virus can be sexually transmitted from a man to his sexual partners and from a female to her sexual partners, especially if they are symptomatic. If a man or woman has lived in, traveled to or plans to travel to an area affected by Zika virus and is sexually active, using...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    Where are the highest risk areas for the Zika virus in the United States?

    Zika has been reported in the high risk areas of Florida and Texas in the United States. The continental U.S. does have the strains of mosquitoes that can become infected with and spread Zika virus, including Aedes aegypti. Cases of Zika in Florida and Texas have been reported as documented cases...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    How can I avoid contracting the Zika virus?

    The best way to avoid contracting the Zika virus is to limit your exposure to Zika by not traveling to countries affected by Zika outbreaks. When traveling to an affected area, wear long-sleeved shirts and long pants to limit skin exposure, stay indoors in screened-in and/or air-conditioned rooms...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    How is Zika virus treated?

    Treatments for Zika virus are being investigated, but there currently is no medication available to prevent or treat Zika infection. Symptoms can be treated with plenty of rest, fluids to prevent dehydration and acetaminophen for fever. Pregnant women will continue to undergo regular monitoring to...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    How is Zika diagnosed?

    Zika virus is diagnosed by a blood test. If a person is experiencing fever, rash, joint pain and red eyes, especially after recent travel to an affected country or being bitten by a mosquito, he or she should visit a health care provider, who can determine if a blood test is needed. Urine may also...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    Can a previous Zika infection present a risk for future pregnancies?

    There is currently no evidence to suggest that a previous Zika infection presents a risk of birth defects for future pregnancies after it has cleared from the bloodstream. Zika virus usually remains in the blood of an infected person for about a week but may be present longer in semen and urine.
    ...Read More
  • Johns Hopkins Medicine

    How does Zika virus spread?

    Zika virus is primarily spread through the bite of infected mosquitoes. If a pregnant woman is bitten by an infected mosquito, the infection can cross the placenta, infecting the fetus. The virus has also been transmitted sexually and through blood transfusion or laboratory exposure. The Food and...Read More