First Candle

Our Mission

First Candle is one of the nation’s leading nonprofit organizations dedicated to safe pregnancies and the survival of babies through the first years of life. Our priority is to eliminate Stillbirth, Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and other Sudden Unexpected Infant Deaths (SUID) with programs of research, education and advocacy. First Candle also provides 24/7 bereavement support for grieving families.

Activity

  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Some experts feel that swaddling in the early weeks can help newborns sleep more comfortably on their backs. This can help minimize the startle reflex and ease colic symptoms in some babies. If you choose to swaddle, take time to learn how to swaddle properly before you leave the hospital. Take care not to swaddle...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Try to do your kick count about the same time every day. Pick a time of day when you know your baby is active. The best time is after you eat a snack or meal. Sit in a chair with your feet up or lay down on your side. Make sure your baby is awake. If you are not sure, try pushing on your tummy. Walking...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Try to do your kick count about the same time every day. Pick a time of day when you know your baby is active. The best time is after you eat a snack or meal. Sit in a chair with your feet up or lay down on your side. Make sure your baby is awake. If you are not sure, try pushing on your tummy. Walking...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Much research has been done to investigate the effectiveness of monitors in preventing Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). In the 1970s and early 1980s, it was thought that monitoring had promise in identifying infants at risk for SIDS and signaling caregivers when infants have life-threatening events that...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Some babies are definitely more at risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) than others. Babies in the following categories have a higher risk of SIDS:
    • Babies born to mothers who smoke during or after pregnancy.
    • Babies placed to sleep on their stomach or side.
    • Babies who share a sleep
    ...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Many parents place babies on their stomachs to sleep because they think it prevents them from choking on spit-up or vomit during sleep. In fact, the opposite is true; babies are less likely to choke when sleeping on their backs. When babies sleep on their back, the esophagus (food pipe) is below the...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    While studies into potential prevention strategies for stillbirth are ongoing, following are some helpful strategies for pregnant women to follow to help reduce the risk of stillbirth:
    • Begin to monitor your baby’s activity at around 28 weeks. Kicks count!
    • Do not smoke, drink alcohol or use
    ...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Also known as “positional plagiocephaly”, experts agree that a flat head is rarely a serious condition and can be avoided if parents make a conscious effort to change the direction the infant’s head faces when they are on their backs.

    In the vast majority of the cases when a baby develops a flattened...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Here are some lifesaving steps parents and caregivers can take to help protect babies from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS):
    • Placing babies on their backs to sleep is the single most important step that parents and caregivers can take to reduce the risk of SIDS.
    • Babies should sleep in a crib
    ...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Some ethnic groups are more prone to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) than others. African American babies are nearly two-and-a-half times more likely to die of SIDS/Sudden Unexplained Infant Death (SUID) than Caucasian babies, and Native American babies are nearly three times more likely to die...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Recent research shows that pacifiers can greatly reduce a baby’s risk for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). Experts recommend providing your baby with a pacifier EVERY time he or she is placed down to sleep.

    While the exact safety mechanism is not yet known, there are many possibilities for this...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    If a child dies of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), child care providers should:
    • Inform parents of other children in your care that an emergency occurred and offer them information about children and bereavement.
    • Debrief your staff and offer support and information on SIDS and bereavement
    ...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    You should give your baby as much “tummy time” as possible when he or she is awake and being supervised. This will help strengthen your baby’s neck and upper body muscles. Begin by laying your newborn on his or her tummy, across your lap. As your baby gets stronger, place him or her on a quilt on the floor...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Following are some guidelines regarding the use of pacifiers. It is important to know that research shows pacifiers can greatly reduce the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).
    • Offer a pacifier at nap time and nighttime. This will give your baby the most protection against SIDS.
    • Wait
    ...Read More
  • First Candle
    First Candle answered:
    Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) is the diagnosis given for the sudden death of a baby under one year of age that remains unexplained after a complete investigation, including an autopsy, examination of the death scene and review of the symptoms or illnesses the baby had prior to dying and any...Read More