Dole Nutrition Institute

Our Mission

The link between food and health promises to be one of the biggest challenges - and opportunities - of the 21st century. What we eat should give life, not take it. Yet, for the first time in our nation's history, poor diet and inactivity are projected to overtake smoking as the leading cause of preventable death. Diets high in refined sugar, processed carbohydrates, saturated and trans-fats add up to too many calories, and too few nutrients.

At the same time, science is rapidly discovering new compounds in fruits and vegetables with the potential to prevent disease and lengthen life. What’s more, while fad diets come and go, countless studies have confirmed that diets rich in fruits and vegetables are the key to losing weight.

The Dole Nutrition Institute was founded to help propagate such information. As chairman of the world's largest provider of fresh fruit and vegetables, David H. Murdock wanted to go beyond offering healthy products. His mission: to cultivate the seeds of knowledge and provide the public with definitive, easily accessible, scientifically-validated information on nutrition and health.

To bring you a cornucopia of useful information, the Dole Nutrition Institute harvests the latest findings from the finest universities around the world, including the eight universities collaborating with Dole scientists at the unprecedented North Carolina Research Campus, home of the Dole Nutrition Research Laboratory. We distribute this valuable info to consumers through a variety of vehicles:  our multiple award-winning 2.5 million circulation Dole Nutrition News, the recently published Dole Nutrition Handbook, videos, brochures, cookbooks and more. To learn more, visit us online at http://www.dole.com/#/nutritioninstitute

Activity

  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    Chinese researchers found that many mothers of premature babies were low on copper. It’s possible that deficient copper could undermine collagen production, contributing to a more precarious pregnancy. In addition, animal research suggests that copper deficiency during pregnancy may lead to lower levels...Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    Though not strictly a nut (they are, in fact, a legume), peanuts contain more protein than tree nuts. They also contain resveratrol -- a potent antioxidant with potential cancer-fighting properties. Though high in healthy unsaturated fats, some peanuts have been cultivated for even higher levels...Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    Pine nuts pack a powerful punch when it comes to manganese. In fact, they’re the only nut that can meet your recommended daily value of this mineral, which is essential for bone health and wound healing. Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    Fresh Fruit Tacos

    Makes: 4 servings
    Prep time: 30 minutes
    Cook time: 0 minutes

    Ingredients
    • 3 tablespoons sugar                                                      
    • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon                                           
    • 4 (6-inch) whole wheat flour tortillas
    • 2 tab
    ...Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    Among the growing list of identified phytochemicals, carotenoids are the best studied. There are currently more than 700 known carotenoids, the most common being the compounds that produce the red, yellow and orange pigments found in colored fruits and vegetables. The best-known, carotene, was first...Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    A diet high in fruits helps protect the joints in a variety of ways, supplying nutrients like vitamin C, which is needed for calcium and iron absorption, collagen formation and protection against free-radical damage. The high fiber, water and other nutrient content in plant-based foods also help...Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    Among the growing list of identified phytochemicals, carotenoids are the best studied. There are currently more than 700 known carotenoids, the most common being the compounds that produce the red, yellow and orange pigments found in colored fruits and vegetables. The best-known, carotene, was first...Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    In a study, vitamin D deficiency was estimated to account for 29 percent of cancer mortality in men. It was strongly associated with colon, breast, pancreatic and prostate cancer, as well as a variety of other ailments, including heart disease. Scientists suspect that the vitamin inhibits cancer-cell growth...Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    In the mid-20th century, public health officials fortified cereals in response to widespread niacin deficiency caused by the modernized grain-milling process. The government mobilized bread and cereal manufacturers to start adding niacin, other B vitamins and some minerals to their products. Today,...Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    Micronutrients have many important functions in the body, but one of the most vital is to help enzymes -- proteins that keep all of our organs functioning -- do their jobs. The body and brain can’t function without enzymes. Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    Excessive sugar intake can increase kidney stone formation, a process which in turn leaches calcium from the bones. Too much sugar can also block absorption of magnesium and calcium, making them unavailable for the formation of bone cells.
    Research has linked excess retinol, the fat-soluble form of vitamin A found...Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    The information you see on food labels provides a quick way to assess how much of the various vitamins and minerals a serving of that food supplies. These daily value percentages are calculated from the recommended dietary allowances (RDA ) for each vitamin and mineral originally developed during...Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    Austrian researchers have shown that consumption of Brussels sprouts can reduce oxidative DNA damage by nearly 40%. Brussels sprouts appear to fight free radicals with double barrels, using both direct and indirect antioxidants. The same researchers found that consumption of the vegetable increased...Read More
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  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    Halibut is one of the safest fish to eat as far as mercury contamination is concerned. It contains some fat, but mostly the heart healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated kind. It’s also very high in selenium, which is needed for the proper functioning of some of the body’s detoxification enzymes...Read More
  • Dole Nutrition Institute
    Macadamias are the highest nuts in total fats and calories, so they should only be eaten in moderation. They are, however, an excellent source of vitamin B1 (thiamin). Though their saturated-fat content excludes them from the FDA ’s qualified heart-health claim, Pennsylvania State University rese...Read More