Alzheimer's Foundation of America

Our Mission

The Alzheimer's Foundation of America is a leading national nonprofit organization whose mission is to provide optimal care and services to individuals confronting dementia, and to their caregivers and families. The New York-based organization unites 1,900 member organizations nationwide that provide hands-on services related to the practical, financial, emotional and social services needs of people affected by the brain disorder. AFA's services include counseling and referrals by licensed social workers via a toll-free hot line, e-mail, Skype, and live chat; educational materials; a free quarterly magazine for caregivers; professional training; divisions to engage and educate teens and college students; and a memory screening initiative.

Activity

  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    While it is important to include children, it is just as vital to consider their feelings. Address the fear factor by helping them have special moments with their relative who has dementia. If their loved one uses inappropriate language or easily becomes angry during the visit, explain that this behavior...Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    With round-the-clock caregiving for a loved one with dementia, it may not be feasible to juggle all of your religious and ethnic observances. You can still keep traditions alive; just reduce their number to avoid feeling overwhelmed and frustrated. Ask your loved one which traditions to choose; it...Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    Since crowds, noise, and altering routines can aggravate confusion and other behavioral problems in people with dementia, revising your get-togethers may be in order. For example, instead of entertaining the whole clan, limit the number of attendees at a celebratory dinner or spread out several smaller...Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    If mass is still important to your loved one with dementia, consider how they can participate. For example, take your loved one to an earlier, less crowded service. If they can not leave their home structure, watch a mass on TV or ask clergy to make a house call. Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    While it is important to include children, it is just as vital to consider their feelings. Address the fear factor by helping them have special moments with their relative who has dementia. If their loved one uses inappropriate language or easily becomes angry during the visit, explain that this behavior...Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    A forum or support group to express feelings and to socialize can help overcome sadness for both caregivers and individuals in the early stages of dementia. Consult with a healthcare professional if you detect warning signs of depression: tearfulness, poor eating habits, withdrawal, inability to...Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    The greatest gift to someone who cares for a loved one with dementia: time. Ask a family member, friend, or healthcare professional to keep your loved one company so you can relish some respite. Take time for some shopping, a walk in the park, checkers with an old friend, or whatever present you...Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    Currently, there is no cure for Alzheimer's disease. Researchers are continually testing the effectiveness of various drug therapies that will control symptoms; slow, reduce and/or reverse mental and behavioral symptoms; and prevent or halt the disease. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved several medications...Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    It can be life-shattering when people obtain a diagnosis of dementia, especially in the earlier stages when they better understand what is happening. Their greatest fears are materializing. As a result, there could be a grief reaction -- a trauma-like state that occurs in response to the losses they are facing....Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    Clinicians diagnose "probable" Alzheimer's disease by doing a thorough diagnostic workup. This can include a complete medical history; physical examination to find evidence of any underlying medical or neurological disorders that may be contributing to symptoms; neuropsychological tests that gauge...Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    Good communication can enable you to get the most out of your visit to a physician or other healthcare professional. Being open and asking questions help toward understanding, and proper diagnosis and treatment of Alzheimer’s disease or a related dementia.

    When accompanying your loved one to a doctor,...Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    The origin of the term Alzheimer's disease dates back to 1906, when Dr. Alois Alzheimer, a German physician, presented a case history before a medical meeting of a 51-year-old woman who suffered from a rare brain disorder. A brain autopsy identified the plaques and tangles that today characterize Alzheime...Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    Alzheimer's disease is the most common cause of dementia, or loss of intellectual function, among people aged 65 and older. It is not a normal part of aging. 

    This progressive, degenerative disorder attacks the brain's nerve cells, or neurons, resulting in loss of memory, thinking and language...Read More
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    We are kicking off a Skype-based support group for teen caregivers of people with Alzheimer's disease on Tuesday, February 18, from 4-5 p.m. EST and on subsequent Tuesdays through April 8. Sessions will be facilitated by one of AFA's licensed social workers. For more information or to register, call 866-232-8484 or email info@alzfdn.org.
  • Alzheimer's Foundation of America
    Free Educational Conference for People with Alzheimer’s Disease and Their Caregivers
    On Wednesday, June 26, the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America (AFA) will offer a hands-on opportunity for people to gain support and practical skills at its free “5 Boroughs Concepts in Care Conference” in New York. This daylong educational event, which will be held at the New York Marriott Marquis hotel in Times Square, will feature three tracks of study, one for family caregivers, one for healthcare professionals and one for people with Alzheimer’s disease or a related illness. Presentations by top health and caregiving experts will range from an understanding of the disease and tips for daily living to more taboo topics, such as heading off potential violence and how to handle inappropriate sexual behavior. For individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, facilitators will engage attendees in horticultural, art, dance and other creative activities that showcase the benefits of social and mental stimulation. AFA will also offer free respite care, supervised by professional caregivers, for people with more advanced dementia who are unable to participate in the sessions. Breakfast, lunch and program materials will be provided. For more information or to register, please call 866-232-8484. If you’ll be in the greater New York area, we hope to see you there!