Bio

Julie Daniluk hosts Healthy Gourmet, a reality cooking show that highlights the ongoing battle between taste and nutrition by using unique groups such as bikers, dragon boat racers and ballroom dancers to challenge their taste buds with nutritious foods. Julie is excited that her show was chosen to be part of OWN (the Oprah Winfrey Network). Similar to Oprah’s book club, programs on OWN explore stories of strength and transformation. Television viewers also recognize Julie from her “busted” segments on The Right Fit (W Network) and The Marilyn Denis Show (CTV) where she examines the foods people need to stay healthy, acting as a nutrition encyclopedia. Her fun and engaging style comes in handy when she creates articles and recipes that are packed with health tips for www.chatelaine.com.
 
After four years of rigorous theatre arts training, Julie found herself reading more about nutrition than about Shakespeare. She had an insatiable appetite for figuring out how and why food affects us so profoundly. She went back to school to become a nutritionist, graduating from the Canadian School of Natural Nutrition, and went on to become a co-operative owner of one of Canada’s largest health food stores, The Big Carrot Natural Food Market. Julie was also health editor for Viva Magazine, a Canadian natural health publication with a national circulation of over 120,000. As a contributor for many online and print magazines, Julie continues to answer diet and nutrition questions from viewers and readers around the world. She offers entertaining and informative answers about why we crave certain foods, while suggesting alternatives for optimal health.
 
Julie’s food activism has led her to speak to the Canadian Government about the potential health risks of genetically modified food. In order to bring food advocacy issues to a wider audience, Julie has been the event producer for festivals such as Bio-Diversity with David Suzuki and FoodShare's Field to Table Festival.
 
Julie’s search for nutritional understanding has taken her around the world. Her greatest joy to date has been cooking on the Greenpeace tall sailing ship the Rainbow Warrior during its GE-free New Zealand tour.
 
After many years of working on the frontline of the nutrition field, Julie’s clients continually asked for a menu-planning healing focused cookbook. Her first book, Meals That Heal Inflammation, helps people enjoy allergy free foods that taste great and assist the body in the healing process.

Specialties:

  • nutrition & dietetics

Affiliation:

  • Author

Location:

  • Toronto, AK

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The availability of both alcohol and caffeine in powdered form that can be added to food or drinks has sparked public concern, but one expert says the substances don't pose equal risks.

    Several states, including Pennsylvania, have taken steps to...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    THURSDAY, Feb. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Having good full-service supermarkets in poor neighborhoods doesn't mean children will have healthier diets, a new study suggests.

    "Low-income and ethnic minority neighborhoods are underserved by supermarkets relative to their higher-income coun...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Gastroenterology:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A common ingredient in many processed foods might increase the risk of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and metabolic syndrome, a new study in mice suggests.

    Emulsifiers are used to improve food texture and to extend shelf life. In experiments ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    TUESDAY, Feb. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Beef, dairy, fruit and certain types of vegetables are among the most common sources for the four major types of foodborne illness that strike nearly 2 million Americans each year, a U.S. government report finds.

    More than 80 percent of E. coli O...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sleep Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Skipping just a single night of sleep leads to a shift in brain activity that seems to spark a desire to consume more fat the following day, a new study suggests.

    The study offers potential insights into the relationship between lack of sleep a...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatric Allergy & Immunology:

    MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Giving peanut products to infants at high risk for peanut allergy may reduce the risk of developing the allergy by 80 percent, a new study suggests.

    For years, the conventional wisdom was to avoid giving peanuts to infants who were at risk for de...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People who are "resistant" to aspirin may be at risk for larger, more severe strokes, South Korean researchers report.

    Doctors often prescribe low-dose aspirin to people at high risk of stroke because the drug helps prevent blood clots. But for ab...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Endocrinology/diabetes/metabolism:

    MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with low levels of vitamin D appear to have an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, even if they aren't overweight or obese, a new study suggests.

    The study included almost 150 people in Spain. Their vitamin D leve...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The water used to mix baby formula plays the biggest role in whether formula-fed babies are exposed to increased levels of arsenic, according to a new study.

    Families that use well water instead of municipal water may need to check it for arsenic ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cutting junk food from kids' diets is important, but if a little sugar and fat helps them eat their veggies, that's a good trade-off, a leading group of pediatricians says.

    New recommendations from the American Academy of Pediatrics emphasize the ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatric Allergy & Immunology:

    SUNDAY, Feb. 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exposing young children with peanut allergies to small amounts of the legumes shows promise as a treatment, researchers report.

    Known as oral immunotherapy, the idea behind the therapy is to slowly increase tolerance to ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Stop chugging sugary soda and munching sweet treats. Cut back on red meats, butter and other sources of saturated fat. Lay off the salt shaker. Eat plenty of fruits and veggies. And don't worry about having an egg and an extra cup of coffee with your brea

    ...Full Article
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neurology:

    FRIDAY, Feb. 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women with multiple sclerosis (MS) have lower levels of important antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients than those without the disease, new research finds.

    "Since MS is a chronic inflammatory disorder, having enough nutrients with anti-infla...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Ophthalmology:

    WEDNESDAY, Feb. 18, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A vision-robbing condition called diabetic macular edema can strike people with diabetes.

    Now, a new study compared three leading drugs for the condition -- Avastin, Eylea and Lucentis -- and found that Eylea came out on top, at least for pati...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Endocrinology/diabetes/metabolism:

    THURSDAY, Feb. 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A new study helps explain why getting too little sleep might boost diabetes risk.

    Researchers say lack of sleep can lead to increased levels of substances called free fatty acids in the blood. These substances interfere with the ability of the ...Full Article