Julie Daniluk

Bio

Julie Daniluk hosts Healthy Gourmet, a reality cooking show that highlights the ongoing battle between taste and nutrition by using unique groups such as bikers, dragon boat racers and ballroom dancers to challenge their taste buds with nutritious foods. Julie is excited that her show was chosen to be part of OWN (the Oprah Winfrey Network). Similar to Oprah’s book club, programs on OWN explore stories of strength and transformation. Television viewers also recognize Julie from her “busted” segments on The Right Fit (W Network) and The Marilyn Denis Show (CTV) where she examines the foods people need to stay healthy, acting as a nutrition encyclopedia. Her fun and engaging style comes in handy when she creates articles and recipes that are packed with health tips for www.chatelaine.com.
 
After four years of rigorous theatre arts training, Julie found herself reading more about nutrition than about Shakespeare. She had an insatiable appetite for figuring out how and why food affects us so profoundly. She went back to school to become a nutritionist, graduating from the Canadian School of Natural Nutrition, and went on to become a co-operative owner of one of Canada’s largest health food stores, The Big Carrot Natural Food Market. Julie was also health editor for Viva Magazine, a Canadian natural health publication with a national circulation of over 120,000. As a contributor for many online and print magazines, Julie continues to answer diet and nutrition questions from viewers and readers around the world. She offers entertaining and informative answers about why we crave certain foods, while suggesting alternatives for optimal health.
 
Julie’s food activism has led her to speak to the Canadian Government about the potential health risks of genetically modified food. In order to bring food advocacy issues to a wider audience, Julie has been the event producer for festivals such as Bio-Diversity with David Suzuki and FoodShare's Field to Table Festival.
 
Julie’s search for nutritional understanding has taken her around the world. Her greatest joy to date has been cooking on the Greenpeace tall sailing ship the Rainbow Warrior during its GE-free New Zealand tour.
 
After many years of working on the frontline of the nutrition field, Julie’s clients continually asked for a menu-planning healing focused cookbook. Her first book, Meals That Heal Inflammation, helps people enjoy allergy free foods that taste great and assist the body in the healing process.

Specialties:

  • nutrition & dietetics

Affiliation:

  • Author

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Age Management Medicine:

    MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A single serving of leafy green vegetables each day may help keep dementia away, new research suggests.

    Researchers evaluated the eating habits and mental ability of more than 950 older adults for an average of five years.

    Those who cons...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- American children are getting fewer calories a day from fast food restaurants, but one-third still eat ready-to-go pizza, chicken and burgers on a daily basis, a new study finds.

    Among kids aged 4 to 19, national health and nutrition surveys show...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Internal Medicine:

    MONDAY, March 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Munching each day on a McIntosh, Granny Smith or other apple might not keep the doctor at bay, but a new study finds apple eaters are less likely to need a prescription medicine.

    The study, funded by the U.S. National Institutes of Health, looke...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    SUNDAY, March 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Highly processed foods account for more than 60 percent of the calories in products Americans routinely buy in grocery stores, a new study finds.

    These foods tend to have more fat, sugar and salt than less-processed foods, the researchers said.Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Age Management Medicine:

    FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Scientists say they've developed an anti-Alzheimer's diet.

    While it couldn't prove cause-and-effect, the new study found that adults who rigorously followed the so-called MIND diet faced a 53 percent lower risk for Alzheimer's, the most common ty...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    FRIDAY, March 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Free school breakfasts may help low-income students do better in the classroom, a new study suggests.

    Students at elementary schools that offered free breakfast had 25 percent better math grades, and similarly higher reading and science grades, t...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Internal Medicine:

    THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Halting the use of cholesterol-lowering statins in terminally ill patients may improve their quality of life, a new study indicates.

    These findings suggest that care for terminally ill patients can be improved by taking them off medication prim...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    THURSDAY, March 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People who have three or more alcoholic drinks per day could be raising their odds for liver cancer, according to a report from a panel of experts.

    But there was good news for java lovers: The report, from the World Cancer Research Fund Inter...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Packing school lunches that kids will like and are easy to eat can be a challenge, according to Amy Reed, a registered dietitian at Cincinnati Children's Hospital.

    Even when parents carefully craft sandwiches into fun shapes, stack fruit kabobs...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- In more good news for those who fill up on bran cereal and quinoa, a new study suggests that older people who eat a lot of whole grains may live longer than those who hardly ever eat them.

    Even the obese and sedentary appear to gain a benefit, t...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    TUESDAY, March 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Researchers say they have found a way that might make chocolate healthier and more delicious.

    Past research has suggested that chocolate is linked to a number of health benefits, such as lower blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and reduced s...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatric Endocrinology:

    MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The more that Mexican-American children adopt mainstream U.S. culture, the greater their risk for type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

    Researchers looked at almost 150 Mexican-American children from North Texas. The kids were between the ages o...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Getting a professional chef's input improves the fruit and vegetable selection in school cafeterias, leading students to eat more of those healthy foods, a new study finds.

    "The results highlight the importance of focusing on the palatability of ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    MONDAY, March 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Vitamin D supplements may slow or prevent low-grade prostate cancer from progressing, a small new study suggests.

    "Vitamin D decreases inflammation in tissues, and inflammation is a driver of cancer," explained Bruce Hollis, the study's lead rese...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    FRIDAY, March 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A number of new varieties of genetically modified apples and potatoes are safe to eat, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration says.

    The agency said it evaluated two varieties of genetically modified apples from Okanagan Specialty Fruits, Inc. in C...Full Article