Dr. Vonda Wright, MD

Bio

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Director of the Performance and Research Initiative for Masters Athletes (PRIMA)

Location:

Activity

  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    The hamstring stretch can be performed lying on the ground or may be as simple as raising your heel up on a stool or chair and leaning forward. I do my personal favorite variation after I run. While still out in the park or street, I place my feet a little more than shoulder width apart and lean forward...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    The key to your back is your front. The muscles of the lower back are actually smaller than the muscles of the abdomen and sides. The large rectus muscles in the front and the oblique muscles on your sides -- also known as your core -- stabilize your back and pelvis and, if strong, act to prevent...Read More
    1
    1. Nicole Minore I love that - the key to your back is your front!
      6 Days Ago
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Orthopedic Surgery:

    WEDNESDAY, June 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Arthroscopic surgery to relieve chronic knee pain in middle-aged and older patients is only temporarily effective and might be harmful, a new analysis suggests.

    Researchers who reviewed 18 studies recommended against the procedure as a treatmen...Full Article

  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Here's how to do the straight leg raises exercise:
    1. Lying flat on your back, engage your core.

    2. Bend one leg up at the knee and keep the other leg straight.

    3. Still lying flat on your back, using the straight leg, tighten the right quad (front of thigh) and raise your leg up off the floor...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Contrary to popular diets, carbohydrates (carbs) are not the enemy. The cells of your body use circulating glucose to make energy at rest and during exercise. Not only do your cells need carbohydrates but your brain is entirely dependent on carbs for energy. Carbs help maintain blood glucose during...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    The truth is that by and large, the active agers and athletes who come into my office with repetitive injuries are stiff as boards! Their hamstrings, their calves, their shoulders, and their backs are all stiff. This perpetual tightness often leads to injury and frustration. These people are not limited...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Besides calcium, there are a few other nutrients needed for bones:
    • Phosphorus: dairy, yogurt
    • Protein: meat, diary, yogurt
    • Vitamin A: fish, dark green leafy vegetables, citrus fruit, cheese, eggs
    • Vitamin B12: meat, fish, eggs, fortified cereal
    • Vitamin C: essential for collagen formation.
    ...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Besides calcium, there are a few other nutrients needed for bones:
    • Phosphorus: dairy, yogurt
    • Protein: meat, diary, yogurt
    • Vitamin A: fish, dark green leafy vegetables, citrus fruit, cheese, eggs
    • Vitamin B12: meat, fish, eggs, fortified cereal
    • Vitamin C: essential for collagen formation.
    ...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Want to lose body fat? Then eat!

    Starving will not make your body fat go away. Remember that thin does not mean fit. Skipping meals makes your body think it is starving and activates all your body's defenses that are meant to protect it from true starvation. Our bodies have developed a variety of...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Happily YES. You must, however, thoroughly rehab your buttocks, core, quad, hamstrings and work hard in therapy to regain all your joint range of motion.
    Most Orthopaedic surgeon encourage their active patients to remain as active as possible after joint replacement. Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    The common causes of chronic knee swelling are arthritis and chronic meniscus tear. Acute knee swelling is due to meniscus tear, ACL/PCL tear or fracture. Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Not in the same joint. Total joint replacement removes the arthritic ends of long bones and replaces them with metal caps. Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Internal Medicine:

    MONDAY, May 25, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Too few women at high risk for osteoporosis are being tested for the bone-depleting condition, while too many women at low-risk are being screened, a new study suggests.

    A team led by Dr. Anna Lee Amarnath of the University of California, Da...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Orthopedic Surgery:

    FRIDAY, May 22, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many young athletes who undergo surgery for a torn anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) need a second operation later on, a new study shows.

    Torn ACLs are widespread among people younger than 21, said researchers at the Hospital for Special Surgery in ...Full Article

  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Fat is not all bad. Despite its bad rap, it provides energy for exercise, and is the essential element of cell membranes. Fat also provides vitamins E, A, and D. There is no recommended daily allowance (RDA) for total fat, but a daily energy intake with 20 -- 35 percent of energy from fat will provide...Read More