Dr. Vonda Wright, MD

Bio

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Director of the Performance and Research Initiative for Masters Athletes (PRIMA)

Location:

Activity

  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Bounding is just what it sounds like. You spring up into the air with each step you take. It looks like you are jogging with high knees in slow motion.


    1. On a springy surface such as a rubber track or grass field, jog with short springy steps while landing on the mid-foot area, not on your...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Skipping is a warm-up exercise that can easily be performed before any kind of exercise. Here's how:


    1. Skip for 20 meters, landing in the mid-foot area with each contact with the ground, and with toes pointed straight ahead.

    2. Try skipping by flexing your knees up high and taking longer...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Warm-up exercise can take the form of an easy walk or a slow jog before a run, or a few slow pool laps before you turn up the speed. Dynamic warm-ups -- warm-ups where you are moving and stretching instead of just standing in one place -- are fun and get the heart pumping and the muscles filled with...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    The lunge is a warm-up exercise that can easily be performed before any kind of exercise. Here's how:
    • Stand with your feet together.
    • Hug one of your knees to your chest and then release your leg.
    • Lunge onto that knee while trying to keep your knee above your ankle and not in front of it.
    ...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    For those of you already working out, you can increase your performance by increasing the intensity of your workout from 60 -- 70 percent to 70 -- 80 percent of your maximum heart rate (MaxHR). Once you are able to move through your workout comfortably at this intensity, you can continue improving...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    When you start exercising, it is important to keep your workout routine simple. Do not make an elaborate plan with multilevel goals. Go for a walk, run, swim, or row -- anything that is logistically practical for you. Remember that just making the decision to exercise does not erase years of sedentary buildup,...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Changes in flexibility are dependent on the frequency and duration of stretching. For people under 65 years old, maximum benefit is achieved with a slow muscle stretch until the muscle feels tight but doesn't hurt. (Slow stretching lengthens muscle fibers without causing tearing and damage. This...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    A fun way to improve your fitness is to do fartlek runs. Fartlek is a Swedish word that means "speed play." This method of increasing your workout intensity alternates running at an easy pace with running at your maximum heart rate. Fartleks allow you to work out without getting tired because as...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    We lose lean muscle mass beginning around age 50. By age 80, we have lost 50 percent of our lean muscle mass. People who are sedentary lose 15 percent of their muscle mass each decade between ages 50 and 70, and 30 percent per decade after age 70. Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Arteries are the tubes that carry blood away from your heart to your lungs and to all the other tissues of the body. Arteries are made of muscle, and like other muscles in our bodies, they tend to stiffen with age. Stiffening or hardening of the arteries also accompanies a high-fat diet and smoking....Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    The fact is that if women wait to focus on fitness until they approach their 50s, they add another degree of difficulty to the process: menopause! Estrogen is a so-called catabolic hormone, which means that one of its functions is to help us burn and use energy stores. As estrogen walks out the door...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Both athlete surveys and randomized studies (done on all sorts of people) have shown that people who do moderate exercise on a near daily basis experience fewer sick days. Exercisers report taking about half the number of sick days as their sedentary peers and having 23 percent fewer upper respiratory...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Orthopedics:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of broken bones increases with both weight gain and loss in older women, according to a new study.

    These findings challenge the widely held belief that weight gain protects older women against fractures, the researchers said.

    T...Full Article

  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    The inchworm is a warm-up exercise that can easily be performed before any kind of exercise. Here's how:


    1. Begin in a push-up position.

    2. Slowly walk your legs toward your hands. Heels may be off the floor.

    3. Continue walking forward until the pull in the back of your legs is uncomf...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    When exercising, your brain makes a substance called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is a type of brain food. Studies have found that active people are more likely to be better adjusted and perform better on tests of cognitive function. And scientists believe this exercise-induced "brain food"...Read More