Dr. Vonda Wright, MD

Bio

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Director of the Performance and Research Initiative for Masters Athletes (PRIMA)

Location:

Activity

  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Both athlete surveys and randomized studies (done on all sorts of people) have shown that people who do moderate exercise on a near daily basis experience fewer sick days. Exercisers report taking about half the number of sick days as their sedentary peers and having 23 percent fewer upper respiratory...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    The inchworm is a warm-up exercise that can easily be performed before any kind of exercise. Here's how:


    1. Begin in a push-up position.

    2. Slowly walk your legs toward your hands. Heels may be off the floor.

    3. Continue walking forward until the pull in the back of your legs is uncomf...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    When exercising, your brain makes a substance called brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is a type of brain food. Studies have found that active people are more likely to be better adjusted and perform better on tests of cognitive function. And scientists believe this exercise-induced "brain food"...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    As you grow older, your heart adjusts. These adjustments come with trade-offs, leaving your heart more vulnerable to disease and other problems. Your maximum heart rate, heart muscle contractility (the ability of cardiac muscle fibers to contract), and the amount of blood coming out of your heart...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Exercise increases the level of "good cholesterol", high density lipoprotein (HDL) in your blood, which acts like Drano to clean out your blood vessels. At the same time, exercise lowers the level of "bad cholesterol", low density lipoprotein (LDL) and triglycerides (which are dangerous fats) and...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Total hip replacement is one of Orthopaedic Surgery's most successful procedures relieving patients from pain and returning quality of life. The indications for hip replacement include osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis of the hip joint, significant pain and inability to perform your normal job or recreational...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    According to researchers at the University of Missouri, thirty minutes of moderate-to-intense aerobic exercise can leave you still feeling on top of the world ninety minutes later. This is because exercise causes the brain to release endorphins, which are natural mood elevators. It's like popping an...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Calves are important in every step we take and look really great when they are in shape. The calves are actually made up of two muscles: the gastrocnemius, which crosses the knee and ankle, and the soleus, which crosses only the ankle. The ends of the gastroc and soleus tendons fuse in the lower part...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Here's how to stretch your quadriceps:

    1. Stand with feet together and hips straight.

    2. Bend your right knee back and take the front of your right foot in your right hand.

    3. Keeping your knees even (i.e., do not let your right knee swing forward), bend your right knee back. You will feel...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Foam rolling is a marvelous way to stretch your tight tendons and muscles. Essentially, this log of hard foam serves as a rolling pin to roll out and stretch your tendons, and is a great way to warm up for activity. I find this tool especially good for stretching hard-to-stretch tissue like the IT...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Bloods clots, also known as deep vein thrombosis (DVT), can be prevented after lower extremity total joint arthroplasty through a variety of methods.
    Mechanical methods of DVT prevention may be recommended by the treating physician. Sequential compressive devices (SCDs) are one such mechanical method....Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    When blood pressure increases, our hearts adjust by pumping harder. This is because the arteries -- the blood vessels that take oxygen-rich blood away from the heart and deliver it to our bodies -- become stiffer and less flexible with age. This stiffening and loss of flexibility causes blood pressure...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    Viscosupplement injections -- joint injections of hyaluronic acid -- are more effective in milder cases of knee osteoarthritis (OA) than in more advanced OA. Good candidates can be any age and have knee OA from a variety of causes. Viscosupplement injections work on 20-year-olds with knee OA due to sports...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    The best healthcare provider to give viscosupplement injections is someone who is very experienced with this injection technique. That can be a physician assistant, nurse, rheumatologist or orthopedic surgeon. What matters is that you go to someone who has been trained to give injections -- and who gives...Read More
  • Vonda Wright, MD - Pittsburgh, PA - Orthopedic Surgery
    Vonda Wright, MD answered:
    The best healthcare provider to give viscosupplement injections is someone who is very experienced with this injection technique. That can be a physician assistant, nurse, rheumatologist or orthopedic surgeon. What matters is that you go to someone who has been trained to give injections -- and who gives...Read More