Dr. Tanya Remer Altmann, MD

Bio

A leading medical authority for the popular press and entertainment industry, Sharecare Editorial Advisory Board member Dr. Tanya Remer Altmann is a best-selling author, parenting expert and media spokesperson. A working mother and UCLA-trained pediatrician who practices in Southern California, Dr. Tanya is a designated spokesperson for the American Academy of Pediatrics, communicating complicated medical issues into easily understood concepts. Education: • MD: Sackler School of Medicine • BA: Claremont McKenna College Residency and Internship • UCLA Board Positions: • National Association of Medical Communicators • American Academy of Pediatrics’ Committee on Communications and Media

Specialties:

  • pediatrics

Affiliation:

  • Community Pediatric Medical Group, Westlake Village, CA

Location:

Activity

  • Breast milk is the perfect blend of nutrition for the optimal growth and development of your baby.  The composition of breast milk changes as your baby grows to benefit your baby at each stage of development.  Breast milk is easier for your baby to digest, and uncommon for your baby to allergic to compared with infant formula.  The...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    MONDAY, July 28, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Infants and children who are at risk of contracting meningitis because of specific health problems should be vaccinated against the infection, according to updated recommendations from the largest pediatrician group in the United States.

    And rout...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Young children with strong reading skills may be on a fast track to a brighter future, a new study suggests.

    Kids with above average reading skills may have higher intelligence levels as they get older, according to B...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    THURSDAY, July 24, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The stereotype of the sex-crazed teenage boy may be dead wrong, according to a small study that asked boys what they really want from romantic relationships.

    In interviews with 33 boys between the ages of 14 and 16, researchers found that most s...Full Article

  • Correcting and preventing constipation are very important no matter what age your kids (or you) are. There are 5 fruits and 4 juices that are natural laxatives.
    • Fruits: prunes, plums, cherries, apricots, and grapes
    • Juices: prune juice, apple juice, apricot nectar, and pear nectar
    I find that prune...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Genetic Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A powerful drug combo may not be as effective against cystic fibrosis as previously thought. New lab research on human cells suggests that one of the medications might stop the other from working properly.

    However, this study's findings aren't ...Full Article

  • If your child seems to follow a pattern of frequent illnesses, although a nuisance, it is unlikely that anything is wrong with her immune system. Children who have problems with their immune system usually have recurrent unusual infections (not regular colds and coughs) such as serious pneumonias,...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children and teens who lose a parent might face an increased risk of an early death in adulthood, a new study suggests.

    People who were children or teens when a parent died had a 50 percent greater risk of death durin...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Maternal & Fetal Medicine:

    TUESDAY, July 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Women who are obese during pregnancy may be more likely to have children with asthma than normal-weight mothers, a new review suggests.

    "We found that, compared with children born from mothers of normal weight, those whose mothers were overweight...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    MONDAY, July 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Low-income teenagers who get into a more rigorous high school may take fewer health risks than their peers at other schools, a new study suggests.

    The study, of low-income Los Angeles teens, found that those who attended "high-performing" high sch...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    MONDAY, July 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Children born to women who smoked during pregnancy appear to have an increased risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to new research.

    The new study also hints -- but doesn't prove -- that nicotine-replacemen...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sexual Health:

    FRIDAY, July 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Only one in five sexually active U.S. teens has been tested for HIV, a new government report shows.

    That percentage is concerning because teens make up a significant share of new HIV infections, researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Contro...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Addiction Medicine:

    THURSDAY, July 17, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Light penalties are the norm for U.S. college students involved in alcohol-related offenses and incidents, a new study says.

    The researchers examined campus police/security responses to serious, underage, and less serious alcohol-related incide...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatric Neurology:

    MONDAY, July 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Infants' brains start laying the groundwork for the physical requirements of speech long before they utter their first words, a new study finds.

    Researchers looked at 7- to 12-month-old infants and found that speech from people around them stimul...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    MONDAY, July 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Risk factors for sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) appear to change with the age of the infant, researchers say.

    They found that younger babies are more likely to die when they're sharing beds, while older babies face a higher risk of sudden dea...Full Article