Dr. Joel Fuhrman, MD

Bio

Joel Fuhrman, M.D. is a board-certified family physician, New York Times best-selling author and nutritional researcher who specializes in preventing and reversing disease through nutritional and natural methods. Dr. Fuhrman is an internationally recognized expert on nutrition and natural healing, and has appeared on hundreds of radio and television shows including The Dr. Oz Show, The Today Show, Good Morning America, and Live with Kelly. Dr. Fuhrman’s own hugely successful PBS television shows, 3 Steps to Incredible Health and Dr. Fuhrman’s Immunity Solution bring nutritional science to homes all across America.

Dr. Fuhrman’s #1 New York Times best-selling book, Eat to Live, originally published in 2003 (Little Brown) has sold over 1,000,000 copies and has been published in multiple foreign language editions. In October 2012, Super Immunity (HarperOne) reached the New York Times best seller’s list and in January 2013, The End of Diabetes (HarperOne) became his third New York Times best seller. Dr. Fuhrman’s most recent books, The Eat to Live Cookbook (Harper One) reached #1 on the New York Times best sellers list during its debut week in October 2013 and The End of Dieting (HarperOne), released in March 2014, was #2 on the list for its debut. In addition, Dr. Fuhrman has written several other popular books on nutritional science which include: Eat for Health (Gift of Health Press), Disease Proof Your Child (St. Martin's Griffin), Fasting and Eating for Health (St. Martin's Griffin) and the Dr. Fuhrman's Nutritarian Handbook and ANDI Food Scoring Guide (Gift of Health Press).


Website

Dr.Fuhrman.com offers the tools to achieve and maintain a unique, healthy dietary lifestyle that facilitates weight loss, reversal and prevention of disease and longevity through nutritional and natural methods. To enable all who wish to benefit from his health-promoting dietary approach, Drfuhrman.com offers books, videos, audios, and a variety of nutritional and food products to help ensure your success.



Dr. Fuhrman's Member center on DrFuhrman.com

Get the support and advice you need directly from Dr. Fuhrman to get healthy, look great and feel better than ever! As a member of our Dr. Fuhrman family, you will gain supportive services and a world-wide community of online members and friends. You will find the knowledge, direct advice and tools to assure your success, regardless of your health challenges. Some features of the member center include over 1,000 searchable recipes, Ask the Doctor Forums, Member Discussion Forums, Teleconferences, a Health Tracker to track your progress and much more! Dr. Fuhrman's advice could save your life.


Activity

  • Joel Fuhrman, MD - Flemington, NJ - Family Medicine
    Joel Fuhrman, MD answered:
    The following are examples of healthy seeds to eat:
    • Flaxseeds aren't just a beneficial omega-3 source, they are also rich in anti-cancer lignans, and their mucilage lubricates and eases bowel movements. It is best to grind your own fresh at home. The best type are the flaxseed grown in low-cadmium
    ...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Vascular Medicine:

    MONDAY, Jan. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many folks in their 30s and 40s chow down on burgers, fried chicken and other fatty foods without fear, figuring they have years before they need to worry about their cholesterol levels.

    But new research reveals that long-term exposure to even sli...Full Article

  • Joel Fuhrman, MD - Flemington, NJ - Family Medicine
    Joel Fuhrman, MD answered:
    The common cold is caused by a host of viral invaders. The primary offenders are the rhinoviruses, but others include coronavirus, parainfluenza virus, respiratory syncytial virus, adenovirus, echovirus, and coxsackievirus. Typically, the common cold is contracted through touching a contaminated object...Read More
  • Joel Fuhrman, MD - Flemington, NJ - Family Medicine
    Joel Fuhrman, MD answered:
    Consuming mushrooms regularly is associated with significant decreased risk of breast cancer in both pre and postmenopausal women. Amazingly, frequent consumption of mushrooms can decrease the incidence of breast cancer by up to 60-70 percent. In one recent study, women who ate at least 10 grams of fresh...Read More
  • Joel Fuhrman, MD - Flemington, NJ - Family Medicine
    Joel Fuhrman, MD answered:
    Pomegranates offer active and significant protection against breast cancer. They contain significant anti-aromatase activity because they are a rich source of ellagitannins. That means they prevent estrogen and testosterone from rising too high in the body and block the stimulation of breast tissues...Read More
  • Joel Fuhrman, MD - Flemington, NJ - Family Medicine
    Joel Fuhrman, MD answered:
    Cultures that eat primarily fresh whole plant foods and avoid excessive added fats, processed foods, animal protein and salt do not experience the age-related increase in blood pressure that we see in the U.S. These elevations in blood pressure are not caused by aging; instead they are due to the cumulative destructive...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Addiction Medicine:

    MONDAY, Jan. 12, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- While the vast majority of American teens say heavy daily smoking is a major health hazard, many others mistakenly believe that "light" -- or occasional -- smoking isn't harmful.

    "All smoking counts," said study lead author Stephen Amrock, a medic...Full Article

  • Joel Fuhrman, MD - Flemington, NJ - Family Medicine
    Joel Fuhrman, MD answered:
    Mushrooms fight breast cancer in so many ways. They contain compounds called aromatase inhibitors that help the body reduce the level of estrogen and prevent estrogen from stimulating breast tissue. Aromatase (sometimes called estrogen synthase) is an enzyme that produces estrogen and is responsible...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    WEDNESDAY, Jan. 7, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- So New Year's Day has come and gone, leaving millions with resolutions to finally shed some pounds.

    However, a new study finds that Americans actually buy more food and more total calories during the days after the holiday season than they do du...Full Article

  • Joel Fuhrman, MD - Flemington, NJ - Family Medicine
    Joel Fuhrman, MD answered:
    Foods rich in zinc include:
    • Oysters, farmed, eastern, cooked, 3 medium -- 13 mg
    • Alaska king crab, cooked, 1 leg -- 10.2 mg
    • Beef, top sirloin, 4 ounces -- 5.6 mg
    • Raw unhulled sesame seeds, 2 ounces -- 4.4 mg
    • Raw or roasted pumpkin seeds, 2 ounces -- 4.2 mg
    • Adzuki beans, 1 cup cooked
    ...Read More
  • Joel Fuhrman, MD - Flemington, NJ - Family Medicine
    Joel Fuhrman, MD answered:
    Numerous studies on the antioxidant, anti-carcinogenic, and anti-inflammatory properties of pomegranate constituents have been published, focusing on treatment and prevention of cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, erectile dysfunction, bacterial infections, antibiotic resistance, and ultraviolet...Read More
  • Joel Fuhrman, MD - Flemington, NJ - Family Medicine
    Joel Fuhrman, MD answered:
    Mushrooms play an important role in the immune system. Mushrooms are unique as they contain many unusual disease fighting compounds that are just beginning to be understood. There are several immune supporting ingredients in mushrooms that empower the body to react quickly and powerfully when we...Read More
  • Joel Fuhrman, MD - Flemington, NJ - Family Medicine
    Joel Fuhrman, MD answered:
    Phytochemicals are key micronutrients needed for the body's immune system. In this video, I explain why it's so important to include phytochemicals, found in natural foods and "G-bombs," in your diet.  Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health:

    MONDAY, Dec. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a type of depression that occurs in some people due to decreased amounts of daylight during the winter.

    That decrease may trigger SAD by disrupting the body's internal clock, causing a drop in levels of a mood-...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    THURSDAY, Dec. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- During the hustle and bustle of the holidays, poisonings involving children increase, experts say.

    The Nebraska Poison Center offers the following advice for a safe holiday season.

    More than 50 percent of calls to the poison center invol...Full Article