Jennifer Hartstein, PsyD

Bio

Jennifer L. Hartstein, PsyD, is currently in private practice in New York City. Dr Hartstein works with children, adolescents, adults and their families who struggle with a wide range of psychological diagnoses, especially affective disorders, such as anxiety and depression.  Dr. Hartstein specializes in the treatment of high-risk children and adolescents and has received intensive training in adolescent suicide assessment.  She has specialized in this population for several years, using a variety of treatment approaches, including Dialectical Behavior Therapy.  Dr. Hartstein is on the advisory board of MTV’s A Thin Line, which focuses on the digital behaviors of teenagers and young adults. Additionally, she is a psychological contributor for a variety of television news programs, radio programs and in print media. Dr. Hartstein is also the author of Princess Recovery: A How-to Guide for Raising Strong, Empowered Girls Who Can Create Their Own Happily Ever Afters.

Specialties:

  • psychology

Affiliation:

  • Child, Adolescent and Family Psychologist

Location:

  • New York, NY

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    FRIDAY, July 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A study involving people who thought they were about to die in a plane crash reveals new clues to the long-term impact that traumatic events have on the brain.

    In August of 2001, passengers on Air Transat flight 236 were ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    FRIDAY, July 3, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A study involving people who thought they were about to die in a plane crash reveals new clues to the long-term impact that traumatic events have on the brain.

    In August of 2001, passengers on Air Transat flight 236 were ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics:

    THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mass killings and school shootings in the United States may be "contagious," inspiring similar killing sprees, new research suggests.

    "The hallmark of contagion is observing patterns of many events that are bunched in time, rather than occurring...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics:

    THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mass killings and school shootings in the United States may be "contagious," inspiring similar killing sprees, new research suggests.

    "The hallmark of contagion is observing patterns of many events that are bunched in time, rather than occurring...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics:

    THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mass killings and school shootings in the United States may be "contagious," inspiring similar killing sprees, new research suggests.

    "The hallmark of contagion is observing patterns of many events that are bunched in time, rather than occurring...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics:

    THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Mass killings and school shootings in the United States may be "contagious," inspiring similar killing sprees, new research suggests.

    "The hallmark of contagion is observing patterns of many events that are bunched in time, rather than occurring...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health & General Preventive Medicine:

    THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk that any one American will die from cancer -- the cancer death rate -- is going down, regardless of sex or race, a new government study reports.

    However, because the United States has a growing aging population, the overall number...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health & General Preventive Medicine:

    THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk that any one American will die from cancer -- the cancer death rate -- is going down, regardless of sex or race, a new government study reports.

    However, because the United States has a growing aging population, the overall number...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health & General Preventive Medicine:

    THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk that any one American will die from cancer -- the cancer death rate -- is going down, regardless of sex or race, a new government study reports.

    However, because the United States has a growing aging population, the overall number...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Public Health & General Preventive Medicine:

    THURSDAY, July 2, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The risk that any one American will die from cancer -- the cancer death rate -- is going down, regardless of sex or race, a new government study reports.

    However, because the United States has a growing aging population, the overall number...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics:

    TUESDAY, June 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From African drums to Viennese waltzes, people from around the world tune into common beats, a new study suggests.

    The research also supports the notion of music as a means of unifying people socially, the researchers said.

    "Our findings ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics:

    TUESDAY, June 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- From African drums to Viennese waltzes, people from around the world tune into common beats, a new study suggests.

    The research also supports the notion of music as a means of unifying people socially, the researchers said.

    "Our findings ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health Nursing:

    TUESDAY, June 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The area of the brain involved in forming new memories, known as the hippocampus, seems to shrink in people with recurring depression, a new study shows.

    Australian researchers say the findings highlight the need to spot and treat depression when...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health Nursing:

    TUESDAY, June 30, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The area of the brain involved in forming new memories, known as the hippocampus, seems to shrink in people with recurring depression, a new study shows.

    Australian researchers say the findings highlight the need to spot and treat depression when...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Vascular Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Cholesterol-lowering statin drugs might influence a person's aggressive behaviors, increasing or decreasing their irritability and violent tendencies, a new clinical trial suggests.

    Men taking statins typically become less aggressive, while wome...Full Article