Jacob Teitelbaum

Bio

Jacob Teitelbaum, MD is a board certified internist and best-selling author of From Fatigued to Fantastic!, Beat Sugar Addiction Now!, and Pain Free 1-2-3. He is the author of landmark research on effective treatments for chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia, illnesses he knows as an insider, having contracted CFS in medical school. “Dr. T” dropped out for a year to recover and in the ensuing 35 years, he has dedicated his career to finding effective treatment.

Specialties:

  • Integrative Medicine

Affiliation:

  • Fibromyalgia Research Center

Location:

  • city, AK

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics:

    FRIDAY, June 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Well-intentioned parents of children with autism may think that special diets or supplements can help their child, but a new study suggests that often these efforts lead to problems.

    As the researchers explain, many children with an autism spectru...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    SUNDAY, April 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Health store employees may encourage teens to buy body-shaping dietary supplements, even though the products' labels state they're for adult use only, researchers report.

    Despite the labeling, it's legal for minors to b...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Naturopathic Medicine:

    TUESDAY, April 21, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Homeopathic treatments could receive greater scrutiny from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in the near future, as their growing popularity has led some critics to call for tighter regulation.

    The FDA on Tuesday wrapped up two days of publi...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health Nursing:

    THURSDAY, March 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- New research suggests that yoga may help ease depression in pregnant women.

    "This is really about trying to develop a wider range of options that suit women who are experiencing these kind of symptoms during pregnancy," lead author Cynthia Batt...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Integrative Medicine:

    FRIDAY, Feb. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture for back pain is more likely to help people who believe the treatment will work, new research suggests.

    The study included 485 people who received acupuncture for back pain and completed questionnaires before they began treatment, at t...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Integrative Medicine:

    TUESDAY, Feb. 10, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Yoga is increasingly popular among U.S. adults and children, two new government surveys reveal.

    One survey found a little less than 6 percent of adult Americans said they had tried yoga, tai chi or qi gong back in 2002, but that figure jumped to ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    MONDAY, Jan. 5, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Despite concerns about potentially dangerous interactions between cancer treatments and herbs and other supplements, most cancer doctors don't talk to their patients about these products, new research found.

    Fewer than h...Full Article

  • Jacob Teitelbaum - city, AK - Integrative Medicine
    Jacob Teitelbaum answered:
    Avoid sweets. They make you feel better briefly, then they throw your blood sugars onto a roller coaster of highs and lows. Instead, eat more protein (meat, beans, cheese, nuts, etc.) which slowly and steadily maintains your sugar at a stable level. When you get symptoms of low blood sugar, the amount of sugar...Read More
  • Jacob Teitelbaum - city, AK - Integrative Medicine
    Jacob Teitelbaum answered:
    Herbal remedies such as willow bark, boswellia, and cherry can be very helpful for headaches.

    Rubbed over the forehead and temples (sides of your forehead), menthol containing creams or oils help relieve headaches (keep it out of your eyes).

    A physical therapy technique called "stretch and spray...Read More
  • Jacob Teitelbaum - city, AK - Integrative Medicine
    Jacob Teitelbaum answered:
    To treat an acute headache, herbal remedies such as willow bark and boswellia can be very helpful, especially when combined with natural muscle relaxants such as valerian and Jamaican dogwood. And there are, of course, the old standbys Excedrin Extra Strength, Tylenol, and Motrin. Prescription me...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    THURSDAY, Nov. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer patients who experience pain and swelling related to their treatment may find relief in acupuncture and exercise, new research suggests.

    In one study, acupuncture helped reduce joint pain by up to 40 percent, said study author Dr. ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Gastroenterology:

    THURSDAY, Oct. 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A man who hoped to detoxify his body with a supplement known as activated charcoal may have instead triggered a case of the intestinal disorder known as colitis.

    Activated charcoal is a supplement that soaks up gases and odors, making it a comm...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Physical Medicine/rehabilitation:

    TUESDAY, Sept. 30, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture doesn't improve knee pain any more than "sham" acupuncture, according to a new study.

    "Among patients older than 50 years with moderate to severe chronic knee pain, neither laser nor needle acupuncture conferred benefit over sham for...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Integrative Medicine:

    THURSDAY, Sept. 25, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. government announced Thursday that it will launch a massive research effort to explore alternative ways of managing chronic pain among members of the military.

    Investigators will also examine the use of alternative treatments for pain-...Full Article