Dr. Jack Merendino, MD

Bio

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Assistant Clinical Professor, The George Washington Univesity School of Medicine. Chairman, Endocrine Section, Suburban Hospital, Johns Hopkins Medicine

Location:

  • Bethesda, MD

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The injectable drug Saxenda may be a helpful tool in the battle against excess weight and obesity, a new study suggests.

    People who injected Saxenda (liraglutide) every day for a year lost an average of 18.5 pounds, compared with an average of 6...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    WEDNESDAY, July 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The injectable drug Saxenda may be a helpful tool in the battle against excess weight and obesity, a new study suggests.

    People who injected Saxenda (liraglutide) every day for a year lost an average of 18.5 pounds, compared with an average of 6...Full Article

  • Jack Merendino, MD - Bethesda, MD - Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism
    Jack Merendino, MD answered:
    The cause of thyroid problems varies depending on which condition one means. Hypothyroidism is the most common thyroid problem. In the United States and Western Europe, most people with hypothyroidism have an autoimmune problem called Hashimoto’s thyroiditis in which the immune system attacks and destroys...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Internal Medicine:

    MONDAY, June 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Neighborhoods with easy access to healthy foods and safe places to exercise may help residents reduce their risk for type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests.

    The study found that the risk of developing diabetes was 12 percent lower in neighborhoods...Full Article

  • Jack Merendino, MD - Bethesda, MD - Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism
    Jack Merendino, MD answered:
    Disease of the retina, or the light-sensing portion of the eye, is a major complication of diabetes, and diabetes remains one of the leading causes of severe vision loss, particularly among younger individuals.  As a result, most physicians recommend that a person with diabetes see an ophthalmologist...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism:

    TUESDAY, June 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The order in which obese people with type 2 diabetes eat their food can affect their blood sugar levels, a small study suggests.

    The new research found that having protein and vegetables before carbohydrates was linked to lower blood sugar and i...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    FRIDAY, June 19, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- High-fructose corn syrup has long been portrayed as a major villain in the American diet.

    But a new school of thought contends that plain old table sugar or even all-natural honey can be just as harmful to a person's he...Full Article

  • Jack Merendino, MD - Bethesda, MD - Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism
    Jack Merendino, MD answered:
    The best answer here is that we’re talking about a boy who is going through puberty! But assuming we are talking about a woman, these symptoms could well mean that there is too much androgenic hormone action in the body. Androgens are hormones that promote male sexual characteristics such as facial and body hair,...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism:

    WEDNESDAY, June 17, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Exercise appears to benefit people with type 2 diabetes in a number of ways, a new study suggests.

    Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas looked at health records from people with type 2 diabetes. They foun...Full Article

  • Jack Merendino, MD - Bethesda, MD - Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism
    Jack Merendino, MD answered:
    In most cases blood tests to measure the thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), total or free thyroxine (T4) level, total or free triiodothyronine (T3) level or anti-thyroid antibodies, such as the anti-thyroperoxidase antibody level, will diagnose hypothyroidism in a pretty clear-cut manner. In some cases...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Sleep Medicine:

    TUESDAY, June 16, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- As women begin menopause, hormone fluctuations increase the risk of sleep problems during certain phases of the menstrual cycle, according to a small new study.

    Researchers analyzed the sleep patterns of 20 women in the earliest stage of menopaus...Full Article

  • Jack Merendino, MD - Bethesda, MD - Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism
    Jack Merendino, MD answered:
    The term “cold” nodule means that a thyroid nodule is not as metabolically active in making thyroid hormone as normal thyroid tissue, and should be contrasted with “warm” thyroid nodules that are about as active as normal thyroid tissue or “hot” nodules which are more active. The term has nothing to do with temperature. It results...Read More
  • Jack Merendino, MD - Bethesda, MD - Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism
    Jack Merendino, MD answered:
    We should start by emphasizing that most benign tumors are not dangerous. Having said that, a tumor can cause problems by where it is located or by how large it is. For example, a benign pituitary tumor may cause problems because it is large and is pressing on the optic nerve in the brain, causing vision loss. Or...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism:

    THURSDAY, June 11, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with type 2 diabetes who don't always have enough money for food have worse blood sugar control than people who don't worry about where their next meal will come from, new research finds.

    "We talk about healthy eating a lot in diabetes ed...Full Article

  • Jack Merendino, MD - Bethesda, MD - Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism
    Jack Merendino, MD answered:
    An ultrasound provides information on the size of the thyroid gland, the sound-wave appearance or “echotexture” of the thyroid tissue, and presence of nodules. With an ultrasound you can also tell whether a nodule is solid or fluid-filled. But a thyroid ultrasound alone is not an appropriate way to diagnose...Read More