Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD

Bio

Dr. Ellen Marmur is a leading dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon. She is a recognized and admired expert in skin cancer diagnosis and surgery, Mohs surgery reconstructive surgery, cosmetic surgery, and women'€™s health dermatology. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Marmur is an Associate Clinical Professor in both the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Genetics & Genomic Research at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

Specialties:

Location:

  • New York, NY

Activity

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Webster's dictionary defines senescence as "the state or process of being or becoming old." Basically our own state of senescence, or decay, involves making less of everything and slowing production down. The factory workers in the skin are heading into retirement, and their work is getting sluggish. Keratinocytes...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    The sex hormones - estrogen, progesterone, and testosterone - take a lot of blame when it comes to problem skin, especially acne flare-ups. During puberty there's a huge surge of hormones that cause growth and development. Remember that the sebaceous glands are attached to the hair follicles; these kick into...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    The link between nutrition and acne is still controversial, and many medical studies are still to be done on the subject. But this much is scientifically proven: chocolate has gotten a bad rap as the instigator of pimple production. It has been proven that chocolate does not cause or aggravate the...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Long-term stress can also age us. In 2004, a study found that the white blood cells of mothers caring for chronically ill children aged more rapidly than those of the control group (mothers with healthy children). The women who perceived themselves to be under high psychological stress (even if they did not...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    These essential fatty acids support skin health, improve nerve and vascular function, and act as antioxidants. Omega-3 has strong anti-inflammatory properties and may calm skin conditions such as rosacea or eczema and minimize redness. It also boosts immune system functioning. Some nutritional studies have...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Exercise and a healthy diet are good for your heart and the blood vessels that oxygenate the body, so they will ultimately benefit your skin too. Eating right, getting enough sleep, cutting down on stress - all these enable your systems to do their jobs. And a healthy complexion is part of the package....Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, Oct. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- While in-office visits may still be best, taking a photo of a skin lesion and sending it to your dermatologist for analysis may be a valuable piece of eczema care, a new study finds.

    "This study shows something interesting -- patients' eczema ...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Your body is constantly under attack from outside forces, and the skin is its greatest defender. It functions like Gore-tex, a high-tech outer sheath that protects us from temperature extremes, wind, and ultraviolet rays from the sun. It's a two-way barrier that not only retains water in the body but...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Ingesting too much of a good thing can be unproductive and possibly destructive. If you over consume vitamin C, your system's protective mechanism expels the excess through urine, and ingesting too many vitamin supplements can have many potentially toxic effects. For instance, an overload of carotene (the type of...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    There are four epidermal layers, the first of which is the stratum corneum. When you touch your skin, what you're feeling is almost thirty layers of dead keratin cells (a protein that also makes up hair and nails). All these inert cells, called keratinocytes, overlap like thin shingles on a roof, with pores (the...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Monounsaturated fats are found in olive oil, canola oil, and avocados. These healthy fats help to maintain the water level in the epidermis and supply the ceramides and fats that keep the bricks and mortar of the skin healthy and intact. This translates into less itchy, healthy-looking, glowing skin. Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Biotin is found in egg yolks, brewer's yeast, bananas, lentils, cauliflower, and salmon. This B vitamin strengthens skin, hair, and nails. (A deficiency is extremely rare because bacteria in your intestines make all the biotin you need.) A deficit can lead to hair loss or dermatitis (itchy, scaly skin). Some...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Melanocytes have the crucial job of producing melanin, the pigment that absorbs ultraviolet light from the sun. Ultraviolet wavelengths can damage or destroy the DNA in cells, causing mutations that can turn into cancers. Once the skin is exposed to sunlight, the melanocytes try to cover all the cells with melanin,...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Vitamin A is found in fish oil, salmon, carrots, dairy products, spinach, and broccoli. Since it promotes normal keratinization (the turnover of skin cells), it helps with conditions such as acne, eczema, and psoriasis. Without it, skin becomes extremely dry and dull. It's important to note that if you...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Every cleanser contains a surfactant, which emulsifies and washes debris and oil from the skin. This may seem obvious, but their names are not. Sodium lauryl sulfate is a stronger detergent and sodium cocyl isethionate is mild. We've always heard that the more cleanser foams, the more drying it will be, and that's...Read More