Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD

Bio

Dr. Ellen Marmur is a leading dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon. She is a recognized and admired expert in skin cancer diagnosis and surgery, Mohs surgery reconstructive surgery, cosmetic surgery, and women'€™s health dermatology. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Marmur is an Associate Clinical Professor in both the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Genetics & Genomic Research at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

Specialties:

Location:

  • New York, NY

Activity

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    The primary reason to go to a dermatologist, unless you have a medical issue, is to get a clean bill of health skin cancer-wise. A total body exam is mandatory once a year, every year - starting at age zero. If you have a one-year-old, take your baby to get an annual dermatologic checkup by a dermatologist. It's...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    The point of a cleanser is to clean off the oil, debris, and makeup that accrue during a normal day, and to do that you don't need anything harsh or too powerful. All soaps or detergents work by a process called "micellation," which breaks down big substances (such as oil or dirt) into smaller ones using...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Plastic/reconstructive Surgery:

    WEDNESDAY, April 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Food and Drug Administration on Wednesday approved an injected drug to help aging Americans plagued what's commonly known as the "double chin."

    The drug, Kybella, contains deoxycholic acid, which the FDA says is "produced in the body ...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Marketing and perception are very powerful forces. A fascinating Duke University study published in 2008 in The Journal of the American Medical Association found that people believed that a more expensive placebo pill actually worked better just because it cost more. Spending more money somehow c...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Sun damage causes most wrinkling in the first place. Antioxidants like green tea are currently being studied for their potential to avert free-radical damage and consequently help prevent wrinkles. However, the jury is still out and many antioxidant products don't offer a stable, and thereby effective, form...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    It's better than nothing but not as effective as wearing a translucent facial lotion with sunscreen. Most of us desire a natural, less-is-more look with our makeup, and less is not more when it comes to sun protection. Applying a sheer layer of tinted moisturizer or a dusting of mineral makeup gives you...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    THURSDAY, April 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Itchy, blistering rashes from poison ivy, oak and sumac are common and are caused by an oil in the plants called urushiol.

    Usually, you can deal with these rashes at home, the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) says. But you should go to the...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    If you have acne-prone skin, take a good, hard look at your lifestyle, your stress level, what you put on your face every day, and what you are eating. Do some detectives work on your particular triggers, and then try to avoid or adjust them. And be sure to choose the right ingredients in your cl...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    One of our goals in medical acne treatment is to prevent scarring, but the inflammation and trauma generated by acne often leave scars behind. Do not make them worse by overusing products that will irritate the skin. Stick with tried-and-true benzoyl peroxide and salicylic acid, but do not pile on...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    It's okay as long as you read the fine print. It's far too easy to go overboard with strong ingredients if you're not careful. For example, you may be using a cleanser that contains a salicylic acid, then applying a lotion with some kind of alpha-hydroxy acid (AHA), and not even know it. This kind of overlap...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Low thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism) causes fish scale–like thickening of the skin that's rough and dry (myxedema). The skin on the hands and feet can turn yellow, the hair on the eyebrows can fall out, other hair becomes coarse, and brittle, and the nails break easily. Hyperthyroidism, caused by...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    There are five types of scars. Some scars present as post-inflammatory hypo- or hyperpigmentation (PIH). Hyperpigmentation is a brown stain on the skin, and hypopigmentation is a white mark that tends to be permanent. This occurs because inflammation from a trauma can stimulate the melanocytes to...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    MONDAY, April 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Counterfeit Botox may have been distributed to doctors' offices and medical clinics across the United States, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns.

    The bogus Botox -- which is considered unsafe and should not be used -- was sold by an unli...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    MONDAY, April 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Drugs that supercharge the body's immune system show promise in treating advanced melanoma, according to a pair of clinical trials.

    The trials both involve drugs called immune checkpoint inhibitors, which essentially prod the immune system to att...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD - New York, NY - Dermatology
    Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Some people are genetically inclined toward sensitive skin, but we all have the potential to acquire it. Overdoing products that break down the stratum corneum cause irritant contact dermatitis and will trigger an immune response as part of the body's healing mechanism. For instance, mixing and m...Read More