Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD

Bio

Dr. Ellen Marmur is a leading dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon. She is a recognized and admired expert in skin cancer diagnosis and surgery, Mohs surgery reconstructive surgery, cosmetic surgery, and women'€™s health dermatology. In addition to her private practice, Dr. Marmur is an Associate Clinical Professor in both the Department of Dermatology and the Department of Genetics & Genomic Research at The Mount Sinai Medical Center.

Specialties:

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Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, Aug. 20, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The speed at which cancer cells grow may help doctors diagnose and treat the most aggressive melanomas, researchers say.

    Using this measure, investigators have found that the deadliest skin cancers occur most often on the head and neck of olde...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Scrubbing can aggravate rosacea or a painfully dry complexion. And because acids work by temporarily lowering the natural pH balance of the skin, they can be very irritating for someone with sensitivity. The gentlest option is lactic acid, which is probably the cheapest and easiest exfoliant around. Just...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    This condition is characterized by thick, red plaque with a white, silvery (micaceous) scale on top. It's itchy and painful and can create big fissures on the skin. It tends to be on extensor surfaces, such as the elbows, knees, and scalp. There are several types of psoriasis, and some can be quite severe, affecting...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Family history is the biggest intrinsic influence on the kind of skin you have. Genetics have everything to do with your skin's tendency toward dryness, oiliness, or sensitivity. A person inherits conditions such as psoriasis, acne, eczema, rosacea, and even a predisposition to skin cancers (which is...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cosmetology:

    THURSDAY, Aug. 14, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Injectable dermal fillers are widely used by people seeking to smooth out wrinkles, but it's important to know the risks of these products before using them, a U.S. government expert says.

    Dermal fillers use a variety of materials to treat facia...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Just below the dermis is the aptly named subcutaneous fat layer, which covers the muscles. It provides shock-absorbent padding for the body and an insulating layer to conserve heat. The fat stored here also serves as an energy source. Coursing through this level are big ropes of collagen to keep...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Adult onset acne can be very complex and confusing for people. Some people have sensitive skin which, when becomes dry or red or irritated—forms pimples. These respond best to anti-inflammatories such as benzoyl peroxide plus resolving the cause of the sensitivity. Dry skin needs a nice moisturizer...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    There are as many medical solutions as there are reasons for dark circles, and each is specific to the cause. If the issue is thinner skin resting over muscle, an injectable filler of either fat (taken from the patient's own supply somewhere else in the body) or hyaluronic acid (such as Restylane or Juv...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Sunglasses = sunblock. Not only can a pair of shades look cool (the bigger and darker, the better!), but lenses that have "98-100% UV protection" help prevent skin cancer. If the sunglasses don't carry the American Optometric Association's Seal of Acceptance, have them tested at the store with a photometer...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    THURSDAY, Aug. 7, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The antibacterial drug Orbactiv (oritavancin) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat drug-resistant skin infections in adults, the agency said in a news release.

    The drug is sanctioned to treat methicillin-resistant <...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    There are as many different kinds of cancer as there are types of cells in the skin. The mind reels with the frightening (although much more uncommon) possibilities. Most skin cancers are linked to sun exposure and immunosuppression. Merkel cell carcinoma, for example, is a rare but aggressive skin cancer...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    WEDNESDAY, July 23, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Painful or itchy skin lesions could be a warning sign of skin cancer, researchers report.

    "Patients sometimes have multiple lesions that are suspicious looking, and those that are itchy or painful should raise high concerns for non-melanoma ski...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Dermatology:

    MONDAY, July 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- A drug already used to treat moderate-to-severe allergic asthma appears to offer relief to people with chronic hives who haven't been helped by standard medications, new research suggests.

    The prescription drug -- omalizumab (Xolair) -- is already...Full Article

  • Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    You need to learn how to read your skin and then tend to it using common sense. For instance, if your skin feels dry, apply a moisturizer. If your nose is particularly oily, use a degreaser such as salicylic acid on that specific area. Being attentive to your general tendency, or skin type, is a good first step in un...Read More
  • Ellen Marmur, MD answered:
    Drug eruptions are often characteristic of certain medications. For example, targeted chemotherapy drugs (that zone in on one area of the body)- such as Taxol, for breast cancer - can cause fingernails and cuticles to become swollen and inflamed (a nail disease called paronychia). Taxol can also trigger...Read More