Dr. Darria Long Gillespie, MD

Bio

Dr. Darria Long Gillespie is Executive Vice President, Clinical Strategy and Chief Doctor at Sharecare, where she answers users' health and wellness questions on her blog Ask Dr. Darria, and brings her expertise as a physician to the development of Sharecare's products and program offerings. In addition to her role at Sharecare, Dr. Darria is an Assistant Professor at the Emory University School of Medicine and works as an emergency room doctor in the Emory University Hospital Emergency Department. She currently is a health contributor on Fox News WAGA Atlanta, has appeared frequently on The Dr Oz Show, and regularly on Fox News Boston. Previously, Dr. Darria was on faculty at Harvard Medical School, where she worked in the ER at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, MA. While at Harvard, Dr. Darria authored a chapter in the preeminent text of Emergency Medicine, and both published and presented academic research articles in disciplines including plastic surgery, orthopedic surgery, and hospital strategic and financial business development Early on in her medical career, Dr. Darria saw patients becoming both frustrated and frightened by medical information that they heard on the news or read online. This compelled her to commit her life's work to provide patients not only with the most accurate information, but also deliver it in a relatable, compassionate voice. Dr. Darria earned her medical degree from the University of Rochester School of Medicine, her residency in emergency medicine from Yale University School of Medicine, and her MBA from Harvard Business School.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Executive Vice President, Clinical Strategy, Sharecare Inc

Location:

Activity

  • Darria  Long Gillespie, MD - Atlanta, GA - Emergency Medicine
    Darria Long Gillespie, MD has updated a blog entry:
    With the recent medical advances of bionics, 3-D printing of body parts, telemedicine and swallowable camera pills, medicine has made enormous tech...Full Post
    1. Hope Cristol Great blog! I'll be checking some of these apps out.
      1 Day Ago
    2. Deborah Wilburn Ditto, I'm sold!
      23 Hours Ago
  • Darria  Long Gillespie, MD - Atlanta, GA - Emergency Medicine
    Darria Long Gillespie, MD posted a photo:
    Has your regular medication ever changed color or shape? This happens from time to time. Please do not panic and just stop taking your pills. Check out my article for some tips to ensure you are taking the right medicine. http://bit.ly/1o28q3m
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Infectious Disease:

    TUESDAY, Sept. 2, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- As the Ebola outbreak continues to overwhelm health-care workers in three West African nations, medical experts from the United States and the United Nations called on Tuesday for a concerted international response to stem history's biggest outbreak of t

    ...Full Article
  • Darria  Long Gillespie, MD - Atlanta, GA - Emergency Medicine
    Children's developing brains can be even more susceptible to the injuries caused by concussions and Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI), which is why it's SO important to protect them.  Consequences of TBI in kids can range from mild and temporary (headache, foggy thinking, nausea, memory difficulties) to fatal...Read More
  • Darria  Long Gillespie, MD - Atlanta, GA - Emergency Medicine
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Infectious Disease:

    FRIDAY, Aug. 22, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Many Americans know little about how Ebola is transmitted and harbor unfounded fears about the possibility of an outbreak in the United States, a new survey shows.

    About four in 10 adults said they are worried that there will be a major Ebola outb...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Infectious Disease:

    THURSDAY, Aug. 21, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- An experimental drug shows promise in treating respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a leading cause of pneumonia in infants, researchers report.

    "We are finally making major progress in being able to treat human RSV infections -- the world's secon...Full Article

  • Darria  Long Gillespie, MD - Atlanta, GA - Emergency Medicine
    The USPTF, American College of Chest Physicians, and American Cancer Society annual low-dose chest CT ("cat scan") for screening.  The imaging test takes less than 10 minutes.  You will lie on a table that slides into the CT, be asked to hold your breath at points during the exam to get the best image...Read More
  • Darria  Long Gillespie, MD - Atlanta, GA - Emergency Medicine
    Darria Long Gillespie, MD posted a photo:
    From fitness trackers to symptom checkers, check out my article for top health and wellness smartphone apps. http://bit.ly/1tecnr7
  • Darria  Long Gillespie, MD - Atlanta, GA - Emergency Medicine
    Many kidney stones will pass on their own--but you could be absolutely miserable in the meantime, depending on their size (and if not, they could make you very sick).  Depending on the size of the stone, treatment can include: prescription medication to accelerate and ease the passage of the stone, pain m...Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Infectious Disease:

    MONDAY, Aug. 18, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- African nations hit hard by the Ebola outbreak should start screening all passengers leaving international airports, seaports and major ground crossings, the World Health Organization recommended Monday.

    The United Nations' health agency reiterate...Full Article

  • Darria  Long Gillespie, MD - Atlanta, GA - Emergency Medicine
    Darria Long Gillespie, MD posted a photo:
    Read my article to learn very important info that every caregiver must have when parents are out of town. http://bit.ly/1pWpZVL
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Infectious Disease:

    FRIDAY, Aug. 15, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- The magnitude of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa may be far greater than the current statistics indicate, officials from the World Health Organization said Friday.

    Patients are flooding treatment centers that have just been opened, and the recor...Full Article

  • Darria  Long Gillespie, MD - Atlanta, GA - Emergency Medicine
    The USPTF, American College of Chest Physicians, and American Cancer Society recommend stopping sreening at age 75. Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Emergency Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, Aug. 13, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of American seniors seen at emergency departments are either malnourished or at risk for malnutrition, a new study reveals.

    Among ER patients aged 65 and older, 16 percent were malnourished and 60 percent were either malnourished...Full Article