Vitamin E

Vitamin E

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    ARealAge answered

    Peanuts are a good source of vitamin E, a nutrient known for protecting eyes from free-radical damage. Vitamin E may also hinder the progression of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Almonds, sunflower seeds, and hazelnuts are other good sources of vitamin E.

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    ARealAge answered

    Vitamin E is an antioxidant that may help prevent heart disease, Alzheimer's, and two common vision stealers -- macular degeneration and cataracts. Government guidelines recommend a daily intake of 22.5 international units (IU) of vitamin E, but this is only enough to prevent deficiency. For optimal health and disease prevention, we recommend that you aim for 400 international units (IU) of vitamin E per day. It's tough to get all the vitamin E you need from food alone, so top off your supply with a daily vitamin E supplement.

    Tip: Take your E with C (1,200 mg). These two antioxidant vitamins work together to prevent the oxidation that causes clogs in blood vessel walls, and pairing them on a daily basis can make you look 3 years younger.

  • 2 Answers
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    AJoel Fuhrman, MD, Family Medicine, answered
    Natural vitamin E is a very complex, fat-soluble chemical structure that includes alpha, beta, gamma, and delta tocopherols and tocotrienols, present in the leaves and seeds of plants. It is a potent antioxidant and free-radical scavenger, and it regulates immune system activity and is essential for life. Its benefits are not equaled by synthetic vitamin E supplements with only one or two vitamin E isomers. Comparing the many forms of vitamin E in sesame seed to the vitamin E in a supplement is like comparing a real horse to a toy horse. Sesamin, a sesame lignan, also has beneficial effects to improve postmenopausal hormonal status, raise antioxidant activity in body cells, decrease risk of breast cancer, and lower cholesterol.
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    ALeo Galland, Integrative Medicine, answered
    If you are taking statins, avoid taking vitamin E. Vitamin E supplements can deplete your body of coenzyme Q10 by increasing its rate of breakdown. The depletion of coenzyme Q10 by statins and vitamin E is likely to be additive. This interaction may explain the scientific data that vitamin E supplements can interfere with the life-saving benefits of statins and increase the severity of heart failure in people with heart disease. High doses of vitamin E (more than 100 international units a day) should not be mixed with statins.
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    AJoan Salge Blake, MS, RD, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
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    Vitamin E is an anticoagulant (anti = against, coagulant = causes clotting), which means that it inhibits platelets (fragments of cells used in blood clotting) from unnecessarily clumping together and creating a damaging clot in your bloodstream. Vitamin E also alters the stickiness of the cells that line your lymph and blood vessels. This decreases the ability of blood components to stick to these walls and clog these passageways.

    There isn’t any known risk of consuming too much vitamin E from natural food sources. Overconsumption of the synthetic form that is found in supplements and/or fortified foods could pose risks.

    Because vitamin E can act as an anticoagulant and interfere with blood clotting, excess amounts in your body increase the risk of hemorrhage. Because of this, the upper level from supplements and/or fortified foods is 1,000 milligrams for adults. This applies only to healthy individuals consuming adequate amounts of vitamin K. (Vitamin K also plays a role in blood clotting. A deficiency of vitamin K can exacerbate the anticoagulant effects of vitamin E.) Individuals taking anticoagulant medication and vitamin E supplements should be monitored by their physician to avoid the serious situation in which the blood can’t clot quickly enough to stop the bleeding from a wound.

    While the upper level of 1,000 milligrams was set to keep you safe, it may actually be too high. A study showed that those at risk of heart disease who took 400 IU (265 milligrams) or more of vitamin E daily for at least one year had an overall higher risk of dying. One theory is that too much vitamin E may disrupt the balance of other antioxidants in the body, causing more harm than good.

    You should always meet with a registered dietitian (RD) before taking a supplement to make sure that it is appropriate for you based on your diet and medical history. You can find an RD in your area at: www.eatright.org.

    vitamins in hand
  • 1 Answer
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    AJoan Salge Blake, MS, RD, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
    vitamins in hand

    Overconsumption of the synthetic form of vitamin E that is found in supplements and/or fortified foods could pose risks.

    Because vitamin E can act as an anticoagulant and interfere with blood clotting, excess amounts in your body increase the risk of hemorrhage. Because of this, the upper level from supplements and/or fortified foods is 1,000 milligrams for adults. This applies only to healthy individuals consuming adequate amounts of vitamin K. (Vitamin K also plays a role in blood clotting. A deficiency of vitamin K can exacerbate the anticoagulant effects of vitamin E.)

    Individuals taking anticoagulant medication and vitamin E supplements should be monitored by their physician to avoid the serious situation in which the blood can’t clot quickly enough to stop the bleeding from a wound.

    Always consult with your health care provider and a registered dietitian before taking a vitamin supplement. To find a registered dietitian in your area, please visit: www.eatright.org.


    vitamins in hand
  • 1 Answer
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    Many prenatal vitamins contain small amounts of vitamin E. Natural forms of vitamin E may be preferable to synthetic forms. Vitamin E is in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) pregnancy category A at doses advocated by the FDA. Doses above the RDA level are in FDA pregnancy category C.

    Use beyond the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) level in otherwise healthy pregnant women is generally not recommended. There is otherwise insufficient evidence regarding the safety of higher doses of oral, topical, or injected vitamin E during pregnancy and breastfeeding, and therefore it is not recommended.

    A combination of vitamins C and E may increase the risk of gestational hypertension (high blood pressure during pregnancy) and low-birthweight infants. Vitamin E use during pregnancy may increase the risk of congenital heart defects.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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    Avoid with known allergy/hypersensitivity to products that contain vitamin E. Skin reactions such as contact dermatitis and eczema have been reported with topical vitamin E preparations, such as ointments or vitamin E-containing deodorants.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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    Children (under 18 years old):

    Recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) for vitamin E are provided in alpha-tocopherol equivalents (ATEs) to account for the different biological activities of the various forms of vitamin E, as well as in international units (IU), because food and supplement labels often use this system. For conversion, one milligram of an ATE=1.5 IU. There is no RDA for infants, but there is a recommended adequate intake (AI) for healthy breastfeeding infants 0-6 months old of four milligrams daily (6 IU), and for infants 7-12 months old of five milligrams daily (7.5 IU). The RDA for children 1-3 years old is six milligrams daily (9 IU); for those 4-8 years old, it is seven milligrams daily (10.5 IU); for those 9-13 years old, it is 11 milligrams daily (16.5 IU); for those older than 14 years old, it is 15 milligrams daily (22.5 IU); for pregnant women of any age, it is 15 milligrams (22.5 IU); and for breastfeeding women of any age, it is 19 milligrams (28.5 IU).

    An upper limit for infants up to 12 months of age has not been established. The tolerable daily upper limit of dosing for those 1-3 years old is 200 milligrams (300 IU); for those 4-8 years old, it is 300mg (450 IU); for those 9-13 years old, it is 600 milligrams (900 IU); and for those 14-18 years old, it is 800 milligrams (1,200 IU).

    Treatment of vitamin E deficiency should be under medical supervision, tailored to the underlying cause of the deficiency, and may include vitamin E taken by mouth or injected into the vein. If the cause is due to chronic malnutrition and there is no evidence of malabsorption, an oral dose that is 2-5 times greater than the RDA may be considered. If the cause is malabsorption that cannot be corrected, then vitamin E injected into the vein may be necessary. Vitamin E absorption may improve if given with meals, in small doses.

    No specific dosing of vitamin E has been well established for other conditions.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.

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    Vitamin E deficiency is rare and may occur in people with diminished fat absorption through the gut (due to surgery, Crohn's disease, or cystic fibrosis), malnutrition, very-low-fat diets, or several specific genetic conditions (abetalipoproteinemia, "ataxia and vitamin E deficiency" [AVED]); in very-low-birthweight premature infants; or infants taking unfortified formulas. Vitamin E supplementation is accepted as an effective therapy for vitamin E deficiency to halt progression of complications. Diagnosis of this condition and its management should be under the care of a physician and nutritionist.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    Copyright © 2012 by Natural Standard Research Collaboration. All Rights Reserved.