Paint Thinner Poisoning

Paint Thinner Poisoning

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A

    About half the cases of paint thinner poisoning involve young children, and certain factors may influence how children are affected. For example, while adults may cough or choke after swallowing a hydrocarbon-containing solution, children may turn blue or hold their breath. Children are also less likely to accurately report what happened and to describe their symptoms, so detecting paint thinner poisoning may be more of a challenge.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Paint thinner poisoning can be very serious, depending on several factors. The severity varies according to the type of hydrocarbon that enters the body, the entry route, and the duration of exposure. For example, the refrigerant Freon is considered more toxic and more likely to cause harm in various body systems than gasoline. Inhaling a hydrocarbon is more dangerous than swallowing it because inhaling increases the risk of lung damage. Chronic exposure such as from habitual glue sniffing poses a greater risk of long-term serious health problems.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    A person with paint thinner poisoning is generally examined in the emergency room, where the physicians determine whether hospital admission is necessary. Someone who swallowed a "nontoxic" hydrocarbon and doesn't develop symptoms will soon be allowed to go home with a caretaker. Someone who has symptoms, such as choking, will have a chest x-ray and remain in the emergency room for a while. If the x-ray does not show signs of lung inflammation, the victim can go home after about six hours. Hospital admission is necessary if signs of lung inflammation or complications of paint thinner poisoning are present.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Some people with paint thinner poisoning never become ill, and some who require treatment for respiratory problems recover within days or weeks. People exposed to hydrocarbons over long periods may develop serious chronic problems such as anemia or leukemia, and some complications can be fatal. Life-threatening complications of paint thinner poisoning include severe lung inflammation, massive lung infection, and blood-filled fluid within the lungs.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Home care for someone with paint thinner poisoning may involve helping with treatments for lung inflammation caused by hydrocarbon exposure. These treatments may include oxygen therapy and medications. If the victim is on oxygen therapy, you'll have to learn how to use the oxygen system to deliver the correct amount. Medications prescribed to reduce lung inflammation include corticosteroids, which act on the immune system and increase the chance of getting infections. If the victim has an infection, antibiotic therapy may be necessary.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    You may have to manage the effects of paint thinner poisoning for up to several weeks, depending on the severity of the damage. With certain types of hydrocarbon exposure, lung damage may not occur and no treatment is needed. If problems with the lungs and airway do occur, they may resolve within a few days or up to six or seven weeks later. During this period, the victim may require oxygen therapy or specific treatments aimed at improving the respiratory system.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Paint thinner poisoning can be prevented in several ways. One way is to use caution. Store solutions such as household cleaners, kerosene, and paint where children can't get to them. When using these products, make sure that ventilation is adequate so you don't inhale the fumes. If you get some on your skin, wipe it off and wash the area.

    The other way to prevent paint thinner poisoning is to talk with children and teenagers about the risks of drinking dangerous substances or inhaling toxic fumes. If your youngster acts irritable or shows other unusual physical or behavioral signs, investigate further to determine if they're sniffing glue or another toxic substance.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Several non-medication treatments may be used to manage respiratory problems in someone with paint thinner poisoning. They include oxygen therapy and certain types of inhalation therapy that maintain a constant level of pressure in the airway. For someone with severe lung damage, a breathing tube may be inserted.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Medications may be used cautiously to manage paint thinner poisoning or its complications. Although forcing someone who has swallowed a hydrocarbon to vomit usually isn't advised, emptying the stomach may be necessary to prevent absorption of a hydrocarbon that's likely to harm multiple organs. A medication that's used to trigger vomiting is called syrup of ipecac.

    An example of a complication of paint thinner poisoning that requires medication therapy is a development of seizures in a teenager who habitually sniffs glue. In this case, the teen may receive a muscle-relaxing drug to control the seizures.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    If the type of hydrocarbon is not likely to cause damage throughout the body, emptying the victim's stomach is avoided to prevent the risk of inhaling the hydrocarbon. A victim who does not develop symptoms within about 6 hours will probably be allowed to go home. A victim who does develop symptoms is typically admitted to the hospital for further testing and treatments are aimed at resolving the specific symptoms.