Celiac Disease

Celiac Disease

Celiac disease is an inherited, auto-immune disease affecting the lining of your small intestine. If you have celiac disease, it means that your body cannot process gluten, which is found in any food containing wheat, barley or rye. While symptoms vary from person to person, many patients will complain of gastrointestinal problems. Anemia is also a very common presenting symptom of celiac disease A life-long gluten free diet is the standard of care for treating celiac disease.

Recently Answered

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    ANancee Jaffe, RD, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    People who have celiac disease can tolerate only tiny amounts of gluten, somewhere between 10 and 50 milligrams (mg) of gluten per day. To give you an idea of what that means, a regular slice of wheat bread has somewhere between 2,500 and 3,000 mg of gluten. Not only do people who have celiac disease need to be on a gluten-free diet, but they must be very careful and strict on that diet.
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    ANancee Jaffe, RD, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    Celiac disease is hereditary, which means it happens in people who have the genes for it. If you want to find out if you do or don't have celiac disease, you can have a genetic test done. About 38% of the U.S. population has the genes for celiac disease, but only 1% will actually ever get celiac disease. The genetics test is more of a rule-out test than a rule-in test. If you don't have the genes for celiac disease, the likelihood of ever getting celiac disease is incredibly small.
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    ANancee Jaffe, RD, Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of UCLA Health
    Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmunity is a condition in which your immune system, which normally protects your body, can't distinguish between healthy tissue and harmful substances and attacks healthy tissue by mistake.

    When someone who has celiac disease eats something that contains gluten, the immune system produces an army of antibodies. It doesn't recognize the gluten, and it doesn't understand how to break it down. Unfortunately, when this army starts to attack the gluten, it actually ends up attacking the small intestine, which is a very serious condition.
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    If you are already diagnosed with celiac disease but are continuing to have problematic symptoms such as bloating, abdominal pain, gas and diarrhea it is a good idea to call your doctor. Make sure that you are eating a strict gluten-free diet.
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Elisabeth_Hasselback_Exclusive

    More and more people are being diagnosed with celiac disease -- which means passing on wheat and other foods that contain gluten. No pasta?! No bread?! No pizza?! In this video, The View's Elisabeth Hasselbeck explains to Dr. Oz why living with celiac disease and eating a gluten-free diet isn't nearly as ominous as it sounds


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    Currently, there is no known method to prevent celiac disease.

    Patients who have celiac disease can prevent symptoms from returning by adhering to a gluten-free diet. A certified dietitian can help patients plan appropriate and healthy gluten-free diets.

    Patients should carefully read the labels of all food products. Food manufacturers in the United States are required to clearly state whether their products contain wheat.

    If children have celiac disease, their baby-sitters, teachers, and other caretakers should be informed of their conditions.

    Patients with celiac disease should always ask about ingredients in the food when dining at a restaurant or someone else's home.

    Patients should consult their healthcare providers and pharmacists before taking any drugs, herbs, or supplements because they may contain gluten.

    Read the labels of cosmetics because some beauty products, such as lipstick, may contain gluten.

    Use self-adhesive postage stamps because stamps that require moistening may be contaminated with gluten.

    Food products can become cross-contaminated with gluten if they come into contact with gluten. For instance, a knife that was used to cut bread should be washed thoroughly with soap and water before it is used to cut food for a patient with celiac disease. Cross contamination may also occur if bread and vegetables were cut on the same cutting board.

      You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



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    • 2 Answers
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      If you have a gluten allergy or celiac disease, you should know that gluten is in all wheat products, including wheat starch and barley. It is very important to read labels carefully. Common wheat-based products such as bread, pasta, pizza and baked goods can be replaced with alternate grain-sourced products such as corn, quinoa, brown rice and flours.
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      AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
      If you spot an itchy or blistery rash on your elbows or knees, it could mean you have Celiac disease. If so, your body is treating the gluten in wheat and other grains as an invader and reacting with this inflammation, which can also appear on your bottom. The rash affects 10 to 15% of people with Celiac disease. If you notice it, try giving up gluten for a period of time, then follow up with your doctor.
      This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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      There is no correlation between type 2 diabetes and celiac disease. The prevalence of celiac disease among people with type 2 diabetes is the same as for the general population, which is about 1 percent.

      However, the prevalence of celiac disease is higher among people with type 1 diabetes. Approximately 8 to 10 percent of people with type 1 diabetes also have celiac disease. Researchers don't know for sure why the prevalence of celiac disease is higher among people with type 1 diabetes, but they think it probably has something to do with the fact that both diseases are autoimmune conditions, and so they may share genetic similarities. Every person with type 1 diabetes should be tested for celiac disease so they can go on a gluten-free diet if necessary. If people with celiac disease continues to eat gluten, they are at risk for developing other complications such as osteopenia, osteoporosis, iron deficiency anemia, fatigue, and more serious complications such as intestinal cancers.

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      APenn Medicine answered
      Gluten intolerance is a lifelong disorder also known as celiac disease, an inherited, autoimmune disease. Celiac disease occurs when there is damage to the small bowel from consumption of gluten, wheat, barley, rye and possibly oats. In the small bowel there are threadlike projections called villi, which absorb nutrients from food we ingest. If left untreated, these villi become flattened and can not absorb nutrients properly.
       
      There are several ways to diagnose celiac disease, such as:
      • A complete blood count (CBC), which indicates common symptoms like anemia and bone loss
      • Malnutrition
      • Antibody screening tests
      • Small bowel endoscopy, which shows the flattened villi
      The only treatment for celiac disease involves elimination of gluten, wheat, barley and rye from your diet.
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