Cancer Prevention

Cancer Prevention

Cancer Prevention

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    AWilliam Li, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    What types of cancer can diet help prevent?
    The types of cancer that are influenced by diet in terms of lowering risk include colon; breast; lung; prostate; cervical and ovarian cancers. Watch disease prevention specialist William Li, MD, explain how diet may lower the risk of some cancers. 
  • 1 Answer
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    AWilliam Li, MD, Internal Medicine, answered
    Can eating certain hard cheeses help prevent cancer?
    There are some hard cheeses, including Swiss, Gouda and Jarlsberg, that can actually prevent cancer. In this video, disease prevention specialist William Li, MD, explains how these hard cheeses work to prevent cancer, and how much you should eat.
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    ARobin Miller, MD, Integrative Medicine, answered
    Which cancer prevention tests, recently reviewed by Consumer Reports, are the best?

    Consumer Reports found there are multiple screening tests like colonoscopies that are good for both men and women depending on their age. There are also some tests that are not recommended watch this video as Robin Miller, MD explains why.

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    AEric M. Genden, MD, Otolaryngology, answered on behalf of The Mount Sinai Health System
    How is holistic treatment used to prevent cancer?

    Researchers are looking at keeping tumors dormant. In this video, Eric Genden, MD, an otolaryngologist at The Mount Sinai Medical Center, explains why doctors and cancer researchers are looking at the immune system in cancer prevention.


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    Decreasing cooking time, blanching potatoes before frying, and post drying (drying in a hot air oven after frying) have been shown to decrease the acrylamide content of some foods.

    This answer is based on source information from National Cancer Institute.

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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Arugula is a cruciferous vegetable like cabbage, broccoli, and cauliflower. This leafy green contains two cancer fighters called kaempferol and quercetin that are released when you chew. One study found eating a cup and a half of leafy greens, like arugula, per day reduced the risk of lung cancer by 15% in nonsmokers. Aim for the same portion in your diet daily.

    Try arugula raw or tossed with olive oil and lemon, or pile it on top of pasta. You can also try baby arugula, which is sweeter and nuttier in flavor. Remember to chew thoroughly to activate its disease-fighting enzymes!
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Grown in the northern United States, dark grapes are known for their tart, musky flavor. Seeded wine grapes like the Concord variety have thick skin and a high concentration of polyphenols, including resveratrol, which has been shown to inhibit lymph, liver, stomach, and breast cancers. This powerful antioxidant is found mostly in the skin and seeds, so make sure to eat the entire grape.

    Have up to 2 cups a week for maximum benefit. If you can’t find Concord grapes, make sure to choose red or purple types -- they contain significantly more resveratrol than their green counterparts.

    For a fun way to eat these superfruits, freeze and add them to your drinks in lieu of ice cubes. For an added antioxidant bonus, pop them in a glass of grape juice, which is also a good source of resveratrol. Try for two 5-ounce glasses of grape juice a week.

    For even more cancer-fighting benefits, indulge in a glass of red wine. This type of vino, especially pinot noir, has been proven to reduce the risk of renal, lung, and ovarian cancers when consumed in moderation a few times a week. Be sure to speak with your doctor before adding any alcohol to your diet.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    Both the skin and juice of this citrus fruit contain a natural flavonoid called hesperidin, a cancer-fighting powerhouse shown to help combat breast, colon, lung, and liver cancer.

    To maximize its cancer-fighting benefits, aim for a half-cup of fresh lime juice a day. Avoid drinking undiluted juice to protect your teeth. Make your own drink by blending together three peeled limes with 2 cups of cold water.

    You can also take advantage of the intense concentration of antioxidants in the fruit’s skin by zesting. Lime zest is perfect as a garnish on grain salads, a flavor-booster for drinks, or as a salt alternative when sprinkled on veggies.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    AMehmet Oz, MD, Cardiology, answered
    A Turkish grain, bulgur wheat is a powerful superfood packed with cancer-fighters, including magnesium, zinc, and fiber. Research has shown that premenopausal women eating more than 30 grams of fiber per day cut their risk of breast cancer in half. Just 1 cup of cooked bulgur wheat supplies 8 grams of fiber -- one-third of your recommended daily dose.

    Choose coarse bulgur wheat, which raises blood sugar more slowly than the finely ground variety. Use this grain as a replacement for rice and potatoes, add it to ground meats as an expander, or serve it as a side dish. To get the most flavor out of your bulgur, try toasting it in a dry, unoiled pan.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    Simple lifestyle changes, including increased exercise, could potentially prevent a third of all common cancers, according to the American Institute for Cancer Research and the World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF).

    "It is distressing that even in 2011, people are dying unnecessarily from cancers that could be prevented through maintaining a healthy weight, diet, physical activity, and other lifestyle factors," Martin Wiseman, a WCRF medical and scientific adviser, told Reuters news.

    In a separate statement, the World Health Organization (WHO) said that lack of exercise is the main cause of 21%-25% of breast and colon cancers, 27% of diabetes, and 30% of heart disease all over the world.

    WHO recommends a minimum of 150 minutes of exercise per week. That's five 30-minute workouts -- not much when you think about it.