LYME: the Great Mimicker

Lyme has great variation in its presentation, depending on where you contracted it, and whether or not you have any other coexisting infections. There is a group of seven or eight microbes that are the most common. According to Klinghardt, the worst ones are Babesia microti and the different forms of Bartonella.

“Underneath that, there’s often an infection with Mycoplasma. We still don’t know if it’s really transferred with the same bite or if the people had it all along and become symptomatic when the immune system is suppressed by the spirochetes,” Dr. Klinghardt says.

Other than the co-infections, there is what I call the “opportunistic infections.” The combined effect of the initial infection is an immune suppressive effect, and then the patient becomes vulnerable to all sorts of other things. The most common things people contract early on in the course if the illness are different forms of parasites, such as protozoa; Babesia itself being one of them.

There is Giardia, amoebas, Trichomonas, malaria, and different forms of infections that aren’t labeled yet. There is a new one, called FL1953. Stephen Frye discovered that. It’s a protozoan organism that’s causing severe fatigue and illness in chronically ill people. It’s almost always present in a patient with Lyme disease.

And then we find a lot of worms in people. They may be microscopic and they may be macroscopic. That means they may be visible in the stool or they may not be visible.”

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