Liz Vaccariello

Bio

Liz Vaccariello is editor-in-chief and chief content officer of Reader’s Digest, where she is responsible for driving editorial direction and product strategy across the brand’s media platforms. They include: Reader's Digest, the second largest paid subscription magazine in the United States with a readership of more than 25 million; ReadersDigest.com, with an audience of over 4 million unique monthly visitors; editions for the iPad, Nook and Amazon Kindle, on which Reader’s Digest is one of the best selling magazines; and books, of which 15.8 million are sold each year. Liz brings decades of experience to her role at Reader’s Digest as editor in chief and author. She is recognized as a trusted, authoritative speaker with deep expertise on issues such as health, food and family, among other areas. In April, 2012 Liz released her new weight loss book, The Digest Diet, which quickly became a New York Times bestseller, and she recently released the follow-ups Digest Diet Cookbook and Digest Diet Dining Out Guide, currently available in stores. Liz also is a six-time New York Times bestselling author, including the 1-million-sold Flat Belly Diet! and Flat Belly Diet!, 400 Calorie Fix. For years, Liz has been a staple on the network morning shows Today and Good Morning America, and has appeared monthly on Rachael Ray to talk about food and lifestyle content featured in the Every Day with Rachael Ray magazine. In 2009, she began guest hosting in the fifth chair on the second season of The Doctors. She has appeared on The View, Regis & Kelly, Dr. Phil, Extra and two seasons of The Biggest Loser. For the past year, Liz has also contributed to Yahoo! Health with her popular weekly "Losing It with Liz" blog. Liz’s approach to a happy, well-rounded life is singular, and fits well with the Reader’s Digest brand promise to give people simple, easy, proven solutions that improve their lives. Her approachable style, high energy and unique vision have been a point of inspiration for the tens of millions of readers of Every Day with Rachael Ray, where she was Editor-in-Chief from May 2010 to October 2011, and Prevention, where she was SVP/Editor-in-Chief from 2006 to 2010. Before Prevention, Liz was executive editor of Fitness magazine. Prior to Fitness, Liz served as Editor-in-Chief of Cleveland Magazine. She earned a B.A. in Communications from the University of Michigan. Today, she lives in South Orange, New Jersey. She and her husband, Steve, a professional photographer, have 8-year-old twin daughters.

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Affiliation:

  • Reader's Digest

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Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Healthcare Insurance & Policy:

    MONDAY, May 2, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- With the nation's largest health insurer exiting all but a few Affordable Care Act exchanges next year, some Americans may be left with fewer choices and some might see higher monthly premiums.

    Experts say that will be the...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Social Work:

    TUESDAY, April 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Young gay and bisexual men may be much more likely to attempt suicide or harm themselves than their older counterparts, and blacks are at greater risk than whites, British researchers report.

    "We know minority groups are at higher risk of poor m...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Healthcare:

    WEDNESDAY, April 27, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A report card on Americans' health finds that racial and ethnic disparities persist, with significant gaps in obesity, cesarean births and dental care.

    But advances have been made in some important areas, including infant death rates, women sm...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Social Work:

    THURSDAY, April 21, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If you're an American aged 20 or under, your expected life span is now less affected by whether you're rich or poor than it used to be, a new study finds.

    Researchers at Princeton University report that the life expectancy gap between rich and ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Long-term Care:

    TUESDAY, April 19, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Americans are living longer, but those extra years may include poor health or a disability, a new study finds.

    Between 1970 and 2010, the average life span for men increased 9.2 years to 76.2 years of age, and for women it increased 6.4 years to...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Healthcare Insurance & Policy:

    MONDAY, April 18, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- State Medicaid expansions under Obamacare have improved low-income Americans' insurance coverage, increased their doctor visits and enhanced detection of chronic health conditions, which could lead to improvements in health, a new study suggests.

    Full Article
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Social Work:

    WEDNESDAY, April 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- More than half of Americans with high rates of hospitalization either don't have regular access to healthy food or are at risk of not having enough food at home, a small study suggests.

    The study highlights obstacles to getting enough food, i...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Preventive Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, April 13, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Staff at many outpatient health care facilities in New Mexico failed to follow recommendations for hand hygiene more than one-third of the time, a new study found.

    Many also fell short on injection safety, putting patients at increased risk fo...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health:

    TUESDAY, April 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Almost 14 percent of U.S. veterans surveyed during a two-year Veterans Affairs (VA) study reported having suicidal thoughts.

    More than 2,000 veterans were surveyed in 2011 and again in 2013. Each time they were asked whether they'd had suicidal ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Healthcare:

    SUNDAY, April 10, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The cost of health care that could save the lives of millions of children and their mothers every year would be less than $5 per person, researchers report.

    The money would expand basic health services -- such as birth control, nutritional supple...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Social Work:

    MONDAY, April 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Where they live and how much they earn significantly affects the average American's longevity, a new study suggests.

    Income may even be a more important factor than geography, the researchers said.

    "We find very...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Healthcare:

    THURSDAY, April 7, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Hearing loss is associated with higher medical costs for late middle-aged adults, a new study finds.

    Researchers examined health care use by nearly 562,000 adults between the ages of 55 and 64 who had private insurance. They found that over 18 m...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism:

    TUESDAY, April 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Americans with diabetes who rely on insulin to keep their blood sugar levels in check are facing sticker shock: A new study finds the price of insulin has tripled in only 10 years.

    Moreover, since 2010, per-person spending on insulin in the Unite...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nephrology:

    TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Chronic kidney disease affects nearly 14 percent of Americans and costs Medicare billions of dollars a year, a new study reveals.

    In 2013, Medicare spent $50 billion on chronic kidney disease among people 65 and older, and $31 billion on those w...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Healthcare:

    TUESDAY, March 29, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Most Americans would want to know if their doctor has a troubled past, but getting that information is difficult, a new report finds.

    Thousands of practicing doctors in the United States are on probation for offenses such as sexual misconduct, d...Full Article