Dr. Michael Breus, PhD

Bio

Michael J. Breus, Ph.D., is a Clinical Psychologist and both a Diplomate of the American Board of Sleep Medicine and a Fellow of The American Academy of Sleep Medicine. He was one of the youngest people to have passed the Board at age 31 and, with a specialty in Sleep Disorders, is one of only 163 psychologists in the world with his credentials and distinction. Dr. Breus is dedicated to informing the public and healthcare communities about “disordered sleep” in a sleep-deprived society.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • Sleep Expert and Clinical Psychologist for Pain Management at Arrowhead Health, Private practitioner at Southwest Spine and Sports

Location:

  • city, AZ

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics:

    TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Day care does not appear to lead to aggressive behavior in children, according to a new study based on Norwegian children.

    Parents worried about day care's effect on their kids should feel reassured by the findings, the researchers said.

    ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics:

    TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- A pair of genetic tests could help parents and doctors better understand the numerous challenges that a child newly diagnosed with autism might face throughout life, a new study suggests.

    The tests tracked down genes that could explain the nature...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Nutrition & Dietetics:

    TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Avoiding middle-age spread could be one way to delay the onset of dementia, a new study hints.

    Researchers found that among 142 elderly adults with Alzheimer's disease, those who were overweight at age 50 tended to develop the memory-robbing diso...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health:

    TUESDAY, Sept. 1, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Although most Americans think mental health care is important, they often believe it's expensive and hard to get, a new survey shows.

    In questioning more than 2,000 adults, nearly 90 percent said they place equal value on mental and physical heal...Full Article

  •  Dr. Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    Yes. Very high doses of caffeine can cause significant problems. With continued use of caffeine over an extended period of time it is possible to develop  a tolerance to caffeine, and  many people will require more and more of the substance to get any  of the desired alerting effect. However taken in large...Read More
  •  Dr. Michael Breus, PhD - city, AZ - Psychology
    To reduce snoring, you want to decongest for better rest; sleeping on your back with a wedge, sleeping on your side, using nasal strips or a neti pot, and aromatherapy can all help. Watch me share tips to quiet snoring. Read More
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Parents can spur math anxiety and poor math performance in children, a new study suggests.

    "We often don't think about how important parents' own attitudes are in determining their children's academic achievement. But our work suggests that if a p...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    SATURDAY, Aug. 29, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Risky behaviors such as reckless driving or sudden promiscuity, or nervous behaviors such as agitation, hand-wringing or pacing, can be signs that suicide risk may be high in depressed people, researchers report.

    Other warning signs may include...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Women in the U.S. military are no more likely than men to develop post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a government study shows.

    "This is the first study to prospectively investigate the development of PTSD in male and female service members who...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Pediatrics:

    FRIDAY, Aug. 28, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Starting or returning to school can trigger anxiety in some children, but parents can help ease worried young minds, a mental health expert says.

    "Anxiety is one of the most common mental health challenges for children. Uncertainty fuels the fears...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychiatry:

    THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- The dark look associated with Goths may not be all show: Teens in this subculture appear more prone to depression and self-harm than their peers, researchers report.

    Fifteen-year-olds who strongly identified as Goth -- recognized by their disti...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Psychology:

    THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Independent researchers couldn't reproduce the findings of more than half of 100 experiments previously published in three prominent psychology journals, a new review reports.

    This review should fuel skepticism over scientific claims, particular...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Mental Health:

    THURSDAY, Aug. 27, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Many American college students start experimenting with booze or drugs over the summer, but winter is the peak time for them to begin illegal use of prescription medicines, according to a U.S. government study.

    "These findings show that college ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Oncology:

    WEDNESDAY, Aug. 26, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Childhood cancer survivors who've had one stroke are at high risk for having another, a new study says.

    Researchers analyzed data from more than 14,300 people in the United States and Canada who were diagnosed with childhood cancers between 197...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Internal Medicine:

    MONDAY, Aug. 24, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Discontinuing high blood pressure treatment in seniors with mild memory and thinking problems did not improve their mental functioning, a new study shows.

    It's known that high blood pressure during middle age is a risk factor for cerebrovascular d...Full Article