Dr. Jill Rabin

Bio

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • The Hofstra-North Shore LIJ School of Medicine

Location:

  • New York, NV

Activity

  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    What are pelvic floor muscles?

    Your pelvic floor muscles are strong, flexible, and voluntary skeletal muscles that you can control and can strengthen or “pump up” through exercise in order to maintain continence. Attached to your pubic bone and to your tailbone (a.k.a. your coccyx), the pelvic floor muscles act as a sling to support...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    What causes urinary incontinence in women?

    Stress incontinence in women may be caused by weakened pelvic muscles or connective tissue (fascia) or weakened urethral sphincter muscles. There are several different explanations for how these muscles lost their original good tone and, consequently, now cause bladder accidents.

    Weakened pelvic muscles

    ...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    How is urinary incontinence treated?

    With proper treatment and a sympathetic and understanding doctor, incontinence may be avoided and treated. Below are just some of the options available to you today. They range from totally noninvasive therapies to surgery. Your doctor can tell you what will work best for you.

    • Modifying your behavior

    ...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    Can stress urinary incontinence (SUI) be prevented?

    By keeping pelvic muscles strong both before and after pregnancy, and also for young people during sports (remember those Kegel exercises!), having the correct amount of fluid per day (not too much or too little as this can lead to frequency or constipation, in that order), maintaining a stable and

    ...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    What is the urinary tract?

    The urinary tract is the passageway through which bodily waste products are filtered and through which urine is produced, stored, and excreted. The upper urinary tract consists of the kidneys and the ureters that are attached to them. The bladder and the urethra are in the lower urinary tract.

    We

    ...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    How can I do a proper Kegel exercise?

    Here’s how to tell that you are doing a Kegel correctly: Insert a tampon into your vagina. Then tug on the string and prevent yourself from removing it. The muscles you feel contracting are your pelvic floor muscles. Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    Can Kegel exercises help bladder control?

    Your pelvic floor muscles are responsible for contracting at the right time so that you can hold in your urine and for relaxing at the right time so that you can urinate. So, as you can see, keeping them healthy is essential for maintaining continence.

    Do keep your pelvic floor muscles in excellent

    ...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    What type of doctor should I see for urinary incontinence?

    The first person to consult is your primary care physician, who will diagnose and treat or rule out infection. If your physician isn’t well versed in the dynamics of incontinence, you may also seek help from your gynecologist, who can determine if you have problems in your pelvic area, but who will

    ...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    How common is urinary incontinence?

    Here are some facts and figures about the many people actually affected by incontinence:

    • More than thirteen million Americans are affected by urinary incontinence, and 85 percent of them are women.

    • Estimates show that one in four women over the age of eighteen experience involuntary urinary leaking

    ...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    How does constipation contribute to urinary incontinence?

    Think about the amount of pressure you put on your bladder when you strain and push to have a bowel movement. Preventing constipation by eating high-fiber foods and drinking plenty of water may help prevent incontinence. In a study of a group of women who experienced fecal incontinence, a positive...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    What is pelvic organ prolapse?

    Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) may cause the vagina, uterus, urethra, small intestine, and rectum to drop below their normal position, possibly causing stress incontinence. The prolapsed organs are covered with vaginal skin, so they just look like big bulges in any of the five areas mentioned below.

    ...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    What function do the kidneys perform?

    The kidneys constantly filter the body’s blood supply by separating and eliminating toxins and waste products from those things that the body needs, such as certain nutrients.

    Urine is a combination of about 5 percent of these dissolved waste products (urea, uric acid, and creatinine) and about 95

    ...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    How is urge incontinence treated?

    The main goal of any treatment program is to allow the patient to develop control of bladder contractions. Treatments include:

    • Behavior modification: retraining the bladder

    • Physical therapy: mastering Kegel exercises, using vaginal weights, and
      using portable biofeedback muscle monitors

    • Medi

    ...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    What is intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD)?

    Intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD) is a less common form of stress incontinence and may happen after pelvic surgery, an anti-incontinence procedure, a vaginal birth, or in conjunction with a neurological problem. Something malfunctions in the urethra and causes it to refuse to stay tightly closed.

    ...Read More
  • Dr. Jill Rabin - New York, NV - OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
    Dr. Jill Rabin answered:

    Why do I pee a little when I sneeze, laugh and cough?

    "Leaking" urine when you sneeze, laugh, or cough could be a condition called stress incontinence. In this video, Dr. Oz Show guest Mara Rabin gives tips on ways to avoid leakage.

    Read More