Dr. Howard Sichel

Bio

I graduated New York Chiropractic college in 1980 and began practicing in 1981. The initial thrust of my practice was the dance community so my techniques for treatment had to change to a more proactive, less rest orientated one.  I saw the need for a better active rehabilitation program and was introduced to Romana Kryshanowska from  the original classical Pilates studio. I immediately saw the stability that my patients received in their daily life and the need for less care from me after taking part in this program. There was a correction being made in their musculoskeletal system that gave them confidence and reduced the exacerbations they suffered from.  Classical Pilates, which was movement -based , took the fear out of their head and empowered them to live and move.

Soon after, I began referring all of my patients to the studio and then opened our own in association with the chiropractic office.  Then due to the demand for better teachers, I opened Power Pilates as an Education center that certified teachers in classical Pilates. It now could be taught system by system with an understanding of what was happening in the person’s body and give the teacher the tools necessary to communicate the brilliance of this work by knowing when to progress someone and when to pull back. We now have the largest education company in classical Pilates that spans 9,000 teachers in 9 different languages.  The goal is simple- Inspire the world to a healthier way of life through classical Pilates.  Movement heals you! Utilizing the teaching tools that are common to our Pilates program, we are introducing these tools to other curriculums as well under Apogee Wellness, teaching instructors the Art of Teaching, which includes communication and leadership  into all movement modalities.

Specialties:

Affiliation:

  • HFPN, NYU School of Physical Therapy, New York Chiropractic College

Location:

  • New York, NY

Group Memberships:

Activity

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Orthopedic Surgery:

    THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A new study finds that throwing a lot of fastballs may increase a pitcher's risk of an elbow injury requiring "Tommy John surgery."

    "Our findings suggest that throwing a high percentage of fastballs rather than off-speed pitches puts more stress ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Cardiac Rehabilitation:

    THURSDAY, May 26, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Physical activity may help extend survival for patients with heart failure, a new review suggests.

    "Patients with heart failure should not be scared of exercise damaging them or killing them," said principal investigator Rod Taylor, director of t...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Developmental-Behavioral Pediatrics:

    WEDNESDAY, May 25, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- There's new hope for children stricken by mysterious developmental delays, with a new study showing that extensive genetic analysis may help determine the cause of their disability.

    Canadian researchers found a precise genetic cause for seven ou...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Alternative & Complementary Medicine:

    MONDAY, May 23, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Legions of arthritis sufferers try physical therapy and anti-inflammatory drugs to no avail. Now, a new study looks East for relief -- to the martial art tai chi.

    Researchers concluded that tai chi offers an alternative t...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Brain Injury Medicine:

    FRIDAY, May 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Students who suffer a concussion may face more school difficulties than their peers with other sports-related injuries, a new study suggests.

    Researchers found that concussed high school and college students had more trouble performing at a normal ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Adolescent Medicine:

    FRIDAY, May 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Growth spurts can affect teen boys' coordination and knock the swagger right out of their stride, a new study reveals.

    "A sudden increase in height affects the body's ability to control established motor skills, such as walking," said lead author M...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Brain Injury Medicine:

    FRIDAY, May 20, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Athletes should not take a blow to the head lightly. New research suggests delayed treatment for concussion could prolong recovery.

    Many college athletes, however, don't immediately recognize or report concussion symptom...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Geriatrics:

    THURSDAY, May 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors are at high risk for falls, but there are ways to reduce that risk, experts say.

    One-third of Americans aged 65 and older fall each year. And, falls are the leading cause of nonfatal and fatal injuries among older Americans, according to ...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Orthopedics:

    THURSDAY, May 12, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Unlike women, men at risk for osteoporosis don't get routinely screened for bone loss, a new study shows.

    As a result, men may not receive treatment or take the steps necessary to protect their bone health, the researchers found.

    "Women h...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Neuromusculoskeletal Sports Medicine:

    WEDNESDAY, May 11, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Professional football players aren't at greater risk of suicide than the general U.S. population, federal health officials report, although players are far likelier to suffer concussions.

    For the study, the researchers calculated the suicide dea...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Vascular Medicine:

    FRIDAY, May 6, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Cholesterol-lowering statins may spare people with narrowed leg arteries from the possibility of amputation and even death, a new study suggests.

    The higher the dose of these drugs, the lower the risk of both outcomes, the researchers found.

    Full Article
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Geriatrics:

    THURSDAY, May 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Millions of American seniors have severe vision impairment, and with it comes the risk of a fall that could lead to disability, a new report finds.

    About 2.8 million seniors are thought to have severe vision impairment -- defined as either blindne...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Fitness:

    WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- You probably already know that strength training, such as lifting weights or doing pushups, is good for you, but now new research suggests it may help you live longer, too.

    When people 65 and older did strength training twice a week, they lowere...Full Article

  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation:

    WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- If possible, people who've had a stroke should be sent directly to inpatient rehabilitation after their hospital discharge. This would be instead of a skilled nursing facility or nursing home, according to new guidelines by the American Heart Association

    ...Full Article
  • Sharecare News
    Sharecare News posted a story about Surgery:

    WEDNESDAY, May 4, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- A surgical robot outperformed human surgeons in stitching the small intestines of pigs back together, researchers report.

    Without any direct human interaction, the Smart Tissue Autonomous Robot (STAR) reconnected the intestines with sutures that ...Full Article