Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson

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  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    What are the health risks of being overweight?

    Not only is obesity closely linked to high blood pressure, unfavorable cholesterol levels, lack of exercise, and diabetes, it also increases your risk for heart disease independent of these other conditions. All forms of obesity are bad for health, but excessive upper-body fat (the "apple shape") is more d...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    How can I prevent osteoporosis?

    To help prevent osteoporosis (a bone-thinning condition that can result in bone fracture), you should try to avoid things that contribute to bone loss: cigarette smoke, of course, but also excess amounts of alcohol, caffeine, animal protein, and vitamin A. Try to limit daily consumption to an average...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    How does high cholesterol cause heart disease?

    The more low-density lipoproteins (LDL) or bad cholesterol in your bloodstream, the greater your heart risk. The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP), a division of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has been evaluating the evolving...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    What is a hammertoe?

    Hammertoe is a deformity of one or more toe joints that causes toe(s) to bend up and curl under like a claw. Sometimes it's caused by heredity, arthritis, or a too-tight tendon, but more often it's the consequence of ill-fitting shoes. A narrow shoe with a tight toe box aggravates the condition,...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    What are the risk factors for diabetes?

    Risk factors for diabetes include:
    • Age. Predominantly a disease of later life, diabetes generally develops after age 40, although the typical age of onset has become lower. People over age 65 are at particularly high risk.
    • Family history. Having a first-degree relative with diabetes raises
    ...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    What is prediabetes?

    A person's blood sugar levels usually rise slowly and progressively over the years, reaching a range classified as prediabetes before they become high enough to signify diabetes. Prediabetes is diagnosed two ways: By elevated blood sugar levels in a person who has not eaten for at least eight hours...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    How is a neuroma of the foot treated?

    Neuroma of the foot can be treated with massage and by wearing roomier shoes fitted with protective pads or orthotics. Cortisone injections also can relieve pain.

    A neurectomy (surgical removal of all or part of the nerve) should relieve the pain but may also leave a portion of the toes without...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    How can smoking increase my risk for heart disease?

    Smoking is the leading preventable cause of death in the United States, and one in three smoking-related deaths is from cardiovascular disease. Even nonsmokers increase their heart disease risk by 25% to 30% when they live with smokers. That said, the damage is reversible. Within a year of quitting,...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    What are some risk factors for depression?

    Risk factors for depression include the following:
    • a family history of depression, particularly in first-degree relatives
    • a parent who has committed suicide
    • a personal history of substance abuse, eating disorders, or a family history of such disorders
    • unresolved grief over a major life
    ...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    Is depression more common in women?

    Psychiatrists and psychologists have devoted much thought and study to the issue of gender and depression. Although there is general agreement that numerous factors contribute to a higher rate of depression in women, the nature of those components is a subject of ongoing debate. The commonly acknowledged ones...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    What is the most effective way to lose weight?

    The best way to lose excess weight, wherever it is located, is to consume fewer calories than you use. One way to start is to follow exercise and dietary guidelines. In fact, information from the National Weight Control Registry, a database of more than 6,000 people who have lost at least 30 pounds...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    How does family history affect my risk for heart disease?

    You have a strong genetic risk if you have a father or brother who was diagnosed with coronary artery disease before age 55 or a mother or sister who developed it before age 65. While your heritage doesn't necessarily consign you to heart disease, it should serve as a signal to be alert for symptoms...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    What are the symptoms of hypothyroidism?

    The symptoms of hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) can differ from person to person. In some women, the onset is so gradual that it's hardly noticeable; in others, symptoms come on abruptly over the course of a few weeks or months. In general, the lower thyroid hormone levels are, the more p...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    How does a woman's risk for heart disease change with age?

    After 55, the chance of having a heart attack begins to rise precipitously in women. Not coincidentally, by that time, most women have gone through menopause, and the protective effects of estrogen -- raising high-density lipoproteins (HDL) and lowering low-density lipoproteins (LDL) levels -- are...Read More
  • Dr. Celeste Robb-Nicholson - Boston, MA - Internal Medicine

    What are the different types of cholesterol?

    Some cholesterol comes from the foods you eat, but most is made by your liver and comes in two basic forms: low-density lipoprotein (LDL) or high-density lipoprotein (HDL). LDL particles carry and deliver cholesterol to cells throughout the body; HDL particles mop up excess cholesterol and carry...Read More