Why does my standing leg hurt when I'm doing the warrior 3 yoga pose?

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You should never feel pain when performing any exercise. If you continue to feel pain, you should discontinue or modify that exercise, and seek the guidance of a medical professional. Movements that are performed incorrectly or in excess can cause inflammation. Reconsider the form that you are using when performing this yoga pose. Make sure that your hips are level and that you are not locking or hyperextending the knee of the standing leg. Try modifying the pose by extending your back leg and both of your arms at a diagonal. Keep a slight bend at the knee. In this pose, you should only be slightly hinging at the hip of the standing leg. Draw-in the belly button toward the spine and focus on consciously contracting the butt and abdomen. You can also try using a chair for support and to take some of the weight off of the standing leg. If modifying this pose does not alleviate symptoms, then discontinue this pose.

Sadie Lincoln
Sadie Lincoln on behalf of barre3
Fitness
Because this is the leg doing most of the work! We are conditioned to believe the part of our body that is active and moving is the part doing all the work, which is not the case. We tend to shift a lot of our weight to the outer hip of the standing leg without pulling up from that same inner thigh to compensate. Being mindful that both sides of our bodies are working in different ways can help to make some necessary modifications, like slightly bending your standing knee, and shifting weight out of your hip/stabilizing side.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.