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What is a radionuclide angiogram?

A radionuclide angiogram is a test used to gather images of the heart throughout its pumping cycle. You may also hear it referred to as a MUGA scan (multigated acquisition scan) or blood pool scan. The test can help assess how well your heart is pumping by measuring what is called the “ejection fraction,” the amount of blood that is pumped out of the heart’s two lower chambers (the ventricles). Generally, a healthy ejection fraction range is 50-70%. The test can be used to determine damage from a heart attack or chemotherapy, for example. A radionuclide angiogram may be performed at rest, or you may be asked to exercise to “stress” the heart.

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