Women's Health

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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    Menstrual periods, like bowel movement patterns, are unique to each individual. In the textbooks, periods occur every 28 days and last for a week. In reality, there is more variation.

    When an adolescent starts having periods, her periods are often very unpredictable for the first six months to a year. At that point, most young women establish a pattern that they can recognize and therefore predict when their next period should arrive. Some may be as short as 21 days, others beyond 30, but what is important is recognizing what your pattern is. Consider the modern calendar -- a period tracker app -- for your phone to figure out your cycle.
    Are terrible cramps okay? Well, no -- absolutely not! First of all, we have several medicines that might help, from ibuprofen and its cousins to using the contraceptive pill to help decrease the amount of cramping and blood loss.
    Additionally, for women who have pain outside the range of normal, doctors begin to be concerned about endometriosis, a condition where extra tissue that belongs inside the uterus may have migrated outside of the uterus into the pelvis and be stuck on the intestines or fallopian tubes, causing pain especially at ovulation (mid-cycle).

    Additionally, if it's PMS symptoms that drive you nuts (bloating, headaches, mood swings, and breast tenderness), there are simple behavioral modifications like quitting caffeine, increasing your calcium intake, and increasing aerobic exercise that will help.

    Please do not suffer in silence! If you have terrible periods that make you miss school, work, or fun stuff. Make an appointment with your doctor.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    That ambient sound a baby hears in the womb - mainly blood running through your blood vessels and the movement of your stomach and intestines - actually reaches the level of about 90 decibels (about the level of background noise in an apartment next to an elevated train). While his developing ears can take those internal noise levels, exposure to very loud external noises can endanger an unborn baby's hearing.
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    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
    Do Women's Vaginal Lubrication Levels Change with Age?

    Aging affects a woman's hair color, skin and muscle tone, but does it impact her vaginal lubrication? In this video, obstetrician and gynecologist Dr. Evelyn Minaya talks about the effect of passing years -- and other factors, as well. 

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    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
    Dr. Evelyn Minaya - How does sexual libido change in women as they age?

    A woman's libido can change as she gets older, says obstetrician and gynecologist Dr. Evelyn Minaya. Find out why and how to reclaim your mojo by watching this video.


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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    What causes scarring of the fallopian tubes?
    Infection and surgery are the two main causes of fallopian tube scarring. In this video, Thomas Antony, MD, of Citrus Memorial Hospital, explains.
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    A , Gynecology, answered
    It’s not practical for every woman to remove her tubes, but if you are not planning a future pregnancy and one of the following circumstances fits you, it’s something to consider:
     
    • If you are scheduled to have a hysterectomy and are not removing your ovaries, ask your doctor to remove your tubes along with your uterus.
     
    • If you are having a tubal ligation, ask your doctor to remove the entire tube rather than just destroying a portion of the tube.
     
    • If you are having pelvic surgery for any reason (ovarian cyst, fibroids, etc.), ask your doctor to remove your tubes even if your husband had a vasectomy and you don’t need the contraception.
     
    • If you have a BRCA mutation and are at very high risk for ovarian cancer, the recommendation is to remove the ovaries and tubes. If you are not ready to remove your ovaries, or choose not to, consider fallopian tube removal as a “next best” option. This is particularly important since many women with BRCA mutations are reluctant to take hormonal contraception due to their high risk of breast cancer.
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    A Psychology, answered on behalf of
    The underside of the vagina has a little lip, the fourchette, which is the equivalent of the male frenulum, the single most important part of the penis. It’s the y-shaped junction of the head to the shaft, where the foreskin, if it’s intact, attaches to the shaft. It’s loaded with nerve endings. In some women it’s super sensitive and way worth the effort of finding. If you have given birth, this area may have torn or been cut, which may cause scarring and leave the area sensitive and sometimes sore.

    Find out more about this book:

    The Good in Bed Guide to Female Orgasms
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    A Psychology, answered on behalf of

    Biologically, the clitoris is not just the nubbin of tissue at the dorsal end of the vulva. The shaft bends back deep within the tissue of a woman’s vulva and splits into two legs (known as crura) that terminate at the mouth of the vagina. Stimulate the clitoris up north, get lubrication down south. The anatomy of the clitoris extends right down to the bottom edge of the vaginal introitus -- the delicate, ever-so-sensitive tissue of the fourchette, the female homologue of the frenulum. The clitoris extends everywhere throughout the vulva.

    Find out more about this book:

    The Good in Bed Guide to Female Orgasms
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    A , Administration, answered

    Hormone treatment is not recommended to improve thinking or prevent dementia, although research on its effects is ongoing. The Women's Health Initiative (WHI) found an increased risk of dementia and no improvement in overall cognitive function for women older than 65 years who took hormones-both the estrogen-progestin combination and estrogen only.

    There is some controversy about whether the WHI results provide a definitive answer to the question of estrogen's effect on cognitive decline. Observational studies have shown a 30 percent reduction in the risk of developing dementia due to Alzheimer's disease by taking hormone treatment. But observational studies are not as trustworthy as randomized, double-blind studies, such as the WHI. More studies have been proposed to investigate the theory that there is a critical window of opportunity for hormone treatment to be beneficial; such studies will examine the timing of hormone treatment (during or after the menopause transition) and its effect on long-term cognitive function and the risk of developing Alzheimer's. So far, no large, randomized, double-blind studies have shown improvement in memory and cognition with hormone treatment, whether taken early or at any time after menopause.

    Find out more about this book:

    Our Bodies, Ourselves: Menopause
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Women and Bone Health

    Memory problems can be an issue after a woman reaches 40. Find out what Dr. Oz recommends to boost memory in this video.