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How does ovulation affect my body?

Patricia Geraghty, NP
Women's Health

Prior to ovulation the dominant female hormone is estrogen. While estrogen production does continue after ovulation, the other female hormone, progesterone, becomes dominant. Some women notice different influences of this hormone. There may be more acne, fatigue, bloating, and even constipation. 

Ovulation means that your body has released a mature egg into the fallopian tube. At this point the egg can be fertilized by sperm, causing pregnancy. A woman is at her most fertile a few days before and immediately after ovulation. Levels of the hormone estrogen increase prior to ovulation, and the hormone progesterone increases at ovulation; these may dilate milk ducts and cause breasts to feel sore.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.