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What are the different parts of the labia?

Emily Nagoski
Emily Nagoski on behalf of Good In Bed
Psychology

The labia is made up of three parts:

 

1. Labia Majora: These are the soft, hairy lips on the outside of the vulva. They are stretchy, like the skin of the scrotum, and tugging at them provides indirect tugging of the clitoris.

 

2. Labia Minora: These are the sensitive inner lips of the vulva, usually some shade of pink in women of all ethnicities. They swell and darken with arousal and are made of very delicate tissue.

 

3. Labial commissure: This is the corner of the mouth, where the lips meet. It is incredibly sensitive. Be aware that the vulva has two labial commissures, the anterior and posterior.

The Good in Bed Guide to Female Orgasms

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