Wellness

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    Learning how to live with illness is a process. Over time, you will find new ways to do that. Living well with illness is not easy, but it is possible. The information below may help you to live well with your illness.
    • When people hear they are ill, they may experience shock. This is completely normal. You might not take in the words the first time you hear your diagnosis. As you begin to understand, it can be difficult to stay focused. Often people appear to be "out of it" during this stage. Some people stay focused but the information seems to sink in later.
    •  As you learn about your illness, it's normal to be lost in thought. You may feel disoriented and emotional, maybe spiritually challenged. Try to make time for yourself. Some people write in a diary, find solitude, or talk to friends, family or a counselor. You might talk to clergy or a chaplain.
    •  After the shock of learning about your illness, you may need to adjust your ideas about who you are and what your future will look like. Letting go of those previous ideas is a loss. You may feel grief and other painful feelings.
    • People do learn to live with illness. Over time, you will find new ways to adapt and adjust your expectations.
    • Each day, you will become more able to find solutions to problems posed by your illness. This takes time. It's a process of trial and error. It can be hard on everyone. But as you figure things out, you'll begin adjusting to a new normal.
    • People find joy in even the most difficult situations. Try to remember that it's possible. If your illness progresses, you might need to adjust all over again. Living well with serious illness is not easy. But it is possible. Reach out to your healthcare team for help when you need it.
    • Emotional anguish, spiritual distress and physical suffering can be part of serious illness. But you don’t have to go through these things alone. Consider talking to a professional healthcare chaplain. Chaplains accept, without judgment, your beliefs, spirituality, faith and practice as well as your doubts and misgivings.
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    The best thing you can do for yourself to prevent chronic illnesses in the future is to eat a healthy diet and exercise regularly. You should also see your primary care doctor regularly. Your doctor can perform recommended screening exams to check for health problems. The earlier a problem is found, the quicker it can be treated.
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    Sitting too much can lead to health problems in many ways. It severely limits the amount of exercise you get each day. This increases your risk for heart disease. Heart disease is the No. 1 cause of death in the United States. Too little exercise is directly linked to cardiovascular disease, including heart attacks and strokes. Sitting too much also raises your risk of diabetes and some cancers. So get up and move, be it walking, jogging or dancing. 
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    A Health Education, answered on behalf of
    Sitting for long periods of time can do multiple things to your body. Research now says that “sitting is the new smoking.” Not only will sitting weaken your core muscles which in turn can cause back, neck, and shoulder issues but it can also weaken your heart function and cause cardiovascular disease.
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    There is no evidence that detoxes are necessary at all, and in my cases, they can actually cause harm.
     
    When it comes to your lungs, your body has an amazing system for keeping them clean, including immune cells and tiny protective cells that serve to push toxins back out of your lungs and out of your body.
     
    Of course, that’s assuming you don’t smoke. If you smoke or use any sort of inhaled tobacco, then the #1 way you can detox is to STOP. If you live around anyone who smokes, you absolutely need to reduce your exposure, as breathing secondhand smoke is just as dangerous as smoking yourself.
     
    As far as your liver, again, your body is amazing at doing its own detox -- and the great news is that you don’t need to do anything to help it! Instead of a detox, take 2 weeks and only put healthy things into your body. That means eating plenty of fruits and vegetables -- you can choose organic if you’d like -- and avoiding alcohol, high-fat foods and sodium. Instead of doing anything to get rid of toxins, focus on only putting the good in your body, and your lungs and liver will thank you for it!
     
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    A , Integrative Medicine, answered
    Free radicals are created as a normal part of metabolism, as the body turns food into energy. We have cellular repair mechanisms that can neutralize them, but there are other factors putting a terrible strain on the system—the environment and our lifestyle. Many environmental factors that stimulate free radical production in our bodies include: exposure to UV rays, radiation, cigarette smoke, automobile exhaust and pesticides. We also cause free radical damage by not getting enough rest or sleep, not managing our stress responses, and not eating healthfully.
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    When a person becomes suddenly ill, he or she usually looks and feels sick. Common signs are:
    • Changes in level of consciousness, such as feeling lightheaded, dizzy, drowsy or confused, or becoming unconscious
    • Breathing problems (i.e., trouble breathing or no breathing)
    • Signs of a possible heart attack, including persistent chest pain, discomfort or pressure lasting more than a few minutes that goes away and comes back or that spreads to the shoulder, arm, neck, jaw, stomach, or back
    • Signs of a stroke, including sudden weakness on one side of the face (facial droop), sudden weakness, often on one side of the body, sudden slurred speech or trouble forming words, or a sudden, severe headache.
    • Loss of vision or blurred vision
    • Signs of shock, including rapid breathing, changes in skin appearance, and cool, pale or ashen (grayish) skin
    • Sweating
    • Persistent abdominal pain or pressure
    • Nausea or vomiting
    • Diarrhea
    • Seizures
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    A answered
    If you're middle-aged, it's not too late to try a new sport, whether it's one that was a childhood dream or something that caught your fancy as an adult. People try new sports for a variety of reasons, including finding new ways to be physically active, to challenge themselves or to keep in shape. There may be work-sponsored leagues or activities that employees join for camaraderie or to expand their social circles.

    However, doctors stress the importance of wearing sports-appropriate protective gear -- helmets, as well as padded guards for your wrists, knees and elbows. Remember that it takes time to get good at a new sport and that while you're excited, it's crucial to pace yourself and gradually increase your activity to avoid injury. Middle-aged people who are thinking about getting involved in a new sport might consider working with a fitness professional or seeking consultation from a medical professional.
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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    Much of the responsibility for motivating young people to think about their long-term health is falling on employers across the nation. More companies are actively encouraging employees to get annual physicals, sometimes even offering basic lab services and health insurance rebates as incentives. Companies understand that if they keep their employees healthy in the long term, they can save both lives and money.
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    A Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered on behalf of
    How Can Lifestyle Changes Affect My Health?
    Lifestyle changes can affect your health but can be difficult to make, says Cres Miranda, MD, a cardiologist at MountainView Hospital. In this video, he says that medications can play a role in better health as well.