Why should I commit to 30 minutes of exercise a day?

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Most of us know we need to be physically active to be healthy. Here’s what we can agree on—we’ll give it to you straight. Science tells us that when it comes down to our overall health, adults, regardless of age, need to do two key types of physical activities:

  • Cardio or Aerobics: At a minimum, do moderately intense cardio activity for at least 30 minutes per day, most days of the week.
  • Strength Training: At a minimum, 2 days per week. 

There are 1440 minutes in a day. 30 minutes of cardio is doable.

I think you should commit to 30 minutes of exercise per day because 30 minutes is managable for most people.  1 hr seems too daunting, 1 hr seems too much but 30 minutes seems reasonable.  For people who are trying to develop healthy habits having realistic expectations are very important.

Most people have 30 minutes to be active so you should commit to 30 minutes for the benefits listed above but mostly because 30 minutes is very doable and realistic.  

Consistency is the key to fitness and 30 minutes leads to consistency, much more than that is hard to maintain for most people.

The benefits of 30 minutes of daily physical activity and exercise are numerous. You can achieve numerous health-related benefits from modest amounts of moderate-intensity exercise, and even greater benefits from vigorous-intensity exercise. In fact, research has confirmed that an individual’s fitness level is one of the strongest predictors of morbidity and mortality. In other words, poor cardiorespiratory fitness is related to a marked increase in risk of premature death from all causes, but particularly from cardiovascular disease. Conversely, an improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness is related to a reduction in premature death from all causes.

The benefits of 30 minutes of daily physical activity and exercise are numerous. You can achieve numerous health-related benefits from modest amounts of moderate-intensity exercise, and even greater benefits from vigorous-intensity exercise, or a combination of both. In fact, research has confirmed that an individual’s fitness level is one of the strongest predictors of morbidity and mortality. In other words, poor cardiorespiratory fitness is related to a marked increase in risk of premature death from all causes, but particularly from cardiovascular disease. Conversely, an improvement in cardiorespiratory fitness is related to a reduction in premature death from all causes.

Dr. Michael Roizen, MD
Internal Medicine
Thirty minutes of exercise a day can really help set your body up for weight loss. Watch this video to learn more about the importance of exercise in Dr. Oz’s Move It and Lose It in 2011.

 

Continue Learning about Weight Loss

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.