Should I talk to my doctor about my atrophic vulvovaginitis symptoms?

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Although a drop in estrogen levels is a natural part of the reproductive cycle that occurs during menopause, women often grow anxious and stressed about the changes that the drop causes in their bodies. If a woman experiences painful symptoms of atrophic vulvovaginitis such as irritation, dryness, or sores, her desire for sex may also slump. However, sex can increase your mood, liven up your relationship with your partner, and frequent sex can even reduce symptoms of atrophic vulvovaginitis. It can be very helpful to ask your doctor about treatment options for women with low amounts of estrogen. Doctors can prescribe anything from lubricants to hormone replacement medication to help reduce painful symptoms.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.