Vulvovaginitis

Vulvovaginitis

Vulvovaginitis
Vulvovaginitis refers to numerous types of infections that can affect the vulva and vaginal area. Causes of vulvovaginitis include yeast, bacteria, parasites STDs and other viruses. If you have symptoms of vulvovaginitis like odor, discharge, itching, rash or pain in the vagina, you should call your doctor. You will want to make sure that you are treated for this condition, as it does not always go away on its own.

Recently Answered

  • 4 Answers
    A
    A , Administration, answered

    Some women with chronic, intense vulvar itching have a skin condition affecting the vulva that can affect other areas of the body as well. Lichen sclerosus is not necessarily related to low estrogen levels, but is more frequently seen in postmenopausal women or in young girls who have not yet gone through puberty than in reproductive-age women. The condition affects between 1 in 300 and 1 in 1,000 people in the population. It may be hereditary and may increase the risk of cancer of the vulva.

    While the cause of lichen sclerosus is still not known, it may be an autoimmune condition. Autoimmune skin conditions result when the body's natural defences launch an attack against the skin, much as they would toward an infection or foreign substance. The result may be white, parchment like skin patches that itch or hurt. The resemblance between the white skin patches and lichen gives the condition its name.

    At first, many women who have this condition believe they have a simple yeast infection and use an over-the-counter remedy or get a prescription for a yeast infection medication from a health care provider. This may provide temporary relief because of the cream's soothing effect, but the symptoms come back. Often, the woman comes to think she has recurrent or chronic yeast infections and treats herself repeatedly. By the time it is correctly diagnosed, the condition has often been present for a long time and may actually have altered the appearance of the vulva.

    See All 4 Answers
  • 4 Answers
    A
    A , Administration, answered

    Vaginitis is a very common disease, which is characterized by an inflammation or infection of the vagina. Vaginitis can be further classified as inflammation of solely the vulva, which is called vulvitis, or inflammation of the vulva as well as inflammation of the rest of the vagina, which is called vulvovaginitis. The vulva can be defined as the external portions of the vagina, including the inner and outer lips (labia majora and labia minora), the vaginal opening and the area surrounding it (vestibule), the urinary opening, and the skin between the vagina and the anus (perineum). Vulvovaginitis is common in women of all ages, and is the leading gynecological disease diagnosed in girls who have not yet reached puberty. Although vulvovaginitis can cause irritation, itching, and a vaginal discharge, it can typically be treated with medication or a topical cream.

    See All 4 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Nonspecific vulvovaginitis is a very common disease in children, which is characterized by an inflammation of the vagina and vulva due to environmental factors. The vulva can be defined as the external portions of the vagina, including the inner and outer lips (labia majora and labia minora), the vaginal opening and the area surrounding it (vestibule), the urinary opening, and the skin between the vagina and the anus (perineum). Nonspecific vulvovaginitis is usually caused by poor hygiene, harsh soaps, or foreign matter (usually toilet paper) in the vagina. Although nonspecific vulvovaginitis can cause irritation, itching, and a vaginal discharge, it can typically be treated with medication or a topical cream; if foreign matter, harsh soaps, or other irritants are causing or complicating the problem they should be avoided.
  • 1 Answer
    A

    Depending on the contributing factors that cause nonspecific vulvovaginitis, it can affect your body in different ways. In most cases of nonspecific vulvovaginitis, an infection of bacteria can spread to the skin due to vigorous itching. It is also common for children to further aggravate their infection by introducing germs from their fingers into their infected vagina because of their itching. Cases of nonspecific vulvovaginitis usually decrease as puberty approaches because the vagina becomes more acidic, which helps prevent infections.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    If you are unsure in any way what could be causing your symptoms, consult your doctor or gynecologist as soon as possible. Your doctor will perform a pelvic exam to check for symptoms such as inflammation, swelling, or redness. You may also be asked about specific hygiene habits or certain products you use. Your doctor may also take a vaginal discharge sample to check for the presence of bacteria, as well as checking your vaginal pH. This process is called a wet prep. If your vaginal pH measures at least 4.5 and there are no signs of a bacterial or yeast infection, a diagnosis of nonspecific vulvovaginitis can be made.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Nonspecific vulvovaginitis is very common and can happen to women of any age. For this reason, it is safe to say that most women will contract nonspecific vulvovaginitis at least once in their lives. Because the causes of vaginal infections vary, it is often difficult or impossible to tell if something will cause irritation or infection. However, some causes of vaginal infection can be predicted or even prevented. For instance, causes such as allergic reactions to soap chemicals or condoms can be prevented only if you are aware of your current allergies. An imbalance of bacteria present in your vagina or vaginal fungus (yeast) can often be prevented by proper hygiene. However, there are some time periods in which your natural vaginal protection is weakened, such as the age before puberty and post-menopause.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    After starting treatment, your nonspecific vulvovaginitis symptoms should be gone within roughly a week. As soon as you notice symptoms such as a vaginal discharge, foul odor, or irritation, talk to your doctor to start treatment immediately. In the meantime, you should step up your hygiene routine to prevent the infection from spreading and to aid in the healing process. This includes washing your hands before touching your genitals and wiping from front to back after using the bathroom. It may also be a good idea to refrain from sexual activity during this time, as you may infect your partner, depending on the cause of your infection. Similarly, it may be helpful for you to use a condom during any future sexual intimacy to avoid both a recurrence of your vaginal infection and the development of sexually transmitted diseases.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    If someone you know experiences symptoms such as irritation or itching of the vagina and vulva (vaginal lips), pain when urinating, or a frothy vaginal discharge, they may have nonspecific vulvovaginitis. If they have not yet reached puberty, their vaginal tissues are especially prone to infection because of the lack of labial fat, estrogen, and genital hair they possess. You can help them by making sure they practice more vigorous hygiene to prevent further infection, while taking them to a doctor for treatment. If they are past puberty or even into menopause, you can help by encouraging them to see their doctor as soon as possible for treatment.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    Nonspecific vulvovaginitis and other vaginal infections can be quite common in women of all ages, though it is most frequently diagnosed in girls who have not yet reached puberty. This occurs because the causes of vulvovaginitis are varied, including irritation from chemicals, allergies, bacteria, or parasites. Most women experience symptoms of vaginitis (inflammation of the vagina) or vulvovaginitis (inflammation of the vagina and vulva) at least once in their lives. In addition to these outside factors and activities, age plays an inevitable role in someone's risk for vulvovaginitis. Because adolescents and postmenopausal women possess decreased levels of estrogen, they consequentially have decreased vaginal protection against infection and irritation. In fact, nonspecific vulvovaginitis is the most commonly diagnosed gynecological disease in girls who have not yet reached puberty.
  • 1 Answer
    A

    Nonspecific vulvovaginitis mostly occurs from a lack of hygiene which causes an infection in the vagina. It is most commonly diagnosed in adolescents who have not reached puberty. Unexplained and frequent cases of nonspecific vulvovaginitis may indicate the onset of a sexually transmitted disease. In children, frequent cases may indicate either poor hygiene habits or even sexual abuse.