Can vitamin E help reduce my risk of cancer?

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Dariush Mozaffarian, MD
Internal Medicine
Some studies have linked higher vitamin E intakes with a lower risk of breast and prostate cancers, but not consistently. And findings from the Women's Health Study, in which healthy women ages 45 and older took 600 IU of vitamin E or a placebo every other day for 10 years, showed no difference in cancer rates between the two groups.

The National Cancer Institute halted a study designed to test whether 200 micrograms (mcg) of selenium and 400 IU of vitamin E, taken alone or in combination, could lower the risk of prostate cancer. The trial was slated to last eight years but was stopped after just five. Researchers had grown concerned that taking the supplements might do more harm than good, based on a slight increase in prostate cancer rates among the men taking vitamin E alone.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.