Vitamin B3 Niacin

Vitamin B3 Niacin

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Common side effects of nicotinamide (a form of vitamin B3) include diarrhea, headaches, itching, dizziness, upset stomach, nausea and flushing of your skin. Seek immediate medical attention if you develop an allergic reaction, such as difficulty breathing, itching, hives, rash, chest tightness and swelling of your tongue, lips, mouth and face.

    Other side effects that require immediate medical attention include bloody stool, dark urine, changes in your vision, loss of appetite, skin numbness or tingling or burning, decreased urination, muscle weakness or pain, irregular or fast heartbeat, persistent nausea, stomach pain, persistent vomiting, swelling of your hands or legs or feet, yellow eyes, yellow skin, feeling unwell, and vomit resembling coffee grounds.

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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    To reduce skin flushing as a side effect of niacin, you can use some of the newer time-released formulas, including the prescription version, Niaspan; or you can take regular over-the-counter niacin just before going to bed. Most people sleep right through the flushing reaction. Taking cholesterol-lowering agents at night is best in any case, because most of the cholesterol manufactured by the liver is produced at night. Another approach to reducing flushing is to use inositol hexaniacinate. This form of niacin has long been used in Europe to lower cholesterol levels and also to improve blood flow in intermittent claudication -- a peripheral vascular disease that is quite common in diabetics. Inositol hexaniacinate has slightly better clinical results than standard niacin, and it is much better tolerated, in terms of both flushing and -- more important -- long-term side effects. If you start out with inositol hexaniacinate and it does not work, try regular niacin. Our experience is that some people will respond only to regular niacin.

    If regular niacin or inositol hexaniacinate is being used, start with a dose of 500 mg at night before going to bed for one week. Increase the dosage to 1,000 mg the next week and to 1,500 mg the following week. Stay at 1,500 mg for two months before checking the response. Then, the dosage can be adjusted up or down, depending on the response. If you are using a time-release niacin product, such as Niaspan, start out at the full dosage of 1,500 mg at night.

    Regardless of the form of niacin being used, I strongly recommend periodic checking (at a minimum of every 3 months the first year and once yearly thereafter) of cholesterol and liver enzymes.
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Vitamin B3 (niacin) supplements are available as a tablet and extended-release tablet, both of which are taken by mouth. Take a tablet each day according to your doctor's instructions with food and at least eight ounces of cool water. Do not take vitamin B3 with hot liquids because you may experience skin irritation and flushing. If you use the extended-release tablet, take it before you go to bed, with a snack and at least eight ounces of cool water. Be sure to swallow it without chewing, and do not break it beforehand.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Vitamin B3, also known as niacin, commonly causes side effects such as feeling flushed, itching or redness of the skin. Alcohol and hot drinks may increase these side effects. To reduce flushing reactions, try taking this medicine with a cool drink. You may also feel dizzy when taking vitamin B3, or it may cause an allergic reaction. Some people may notice that vitamin B3 causes insomnia. But such side effects of vitamin B3 may fade as you consume it on a regular basis.

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    A answered
    You need to be careful, as the structure of red yeast rice is the same as a statin. Taking it with niacin can increase your risk of muscle pain and weakness. Please review your use of red yeast rice with your doctor and ask if niacin is something you should take. You may also wish to review your most recent cholesterol levels with your doctor so that you can see how well you are doing to control your cholesterol.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    If you are taking vitamin B3 on a regular basis, try to take it at the same time every day -- preferably with meals -- and at least eight ounces of cool water according to your doctor's or the label's instructions. Taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory like aspirin one half hour before taking B3 may reduce side effects of skin irritation and flushing. Do not take B3 with hot liquids, or you will probably experience more side effects. If you take the extended-release tablet before going to bed, take it with a snack and at least eight ounces of cool water. Be sure to swallow it without chewing, and do not break it beforehand.