Vitamin B3 Niacin

Vitamin B3 Niacin

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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    Despite the fact that niacin has demonstrated better overall results than statins in reducing risk factors for coronary heart disease, physicians are often reluctant to recommend niacin except in the form of the time-released prescription product Niaspan. The reason is a widespread perception by doctors that over-the-counter regular niacin is difficult to work with because of a bothersome flushing of the skin -- like a prickly heat rash -- which typically occurs 20 to 30 minutes after the niacin is taken and disappears in about 20 to 30 minutes more. Other occasional side effects of niacin include gastric irritation, nausea, and liver damage.

    One main reason why niacin is not recommended more by doctors is that it is a widely available generic agent available over the counter in health food stores and drugstores, so no pharmaceutical company stands to enjoy the huge profits that the other lipid-lowering agents have generated. As a result, niacin does not get the intensive advertising that the statin drugs have been given. Despite the advantages of niacin over other lipid-lowering drugs, the prescription form, Niaspan, accounts for less than 10 percent of all cholesterol-lowering prescriptions.
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    Pellagra (niacin)

    Nicotinamide is approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the prevention and treatment of pellagra, a vitamin B3 deficiency disease.

    Hyperpigmentation

    In preliminary research, nicotinamide decreased hyperpigmentation (darkening of patches of skin). Well-designed clinical trials are needed before a conclusion can be made.

    Type 1 Diabetes mellitus: preservation of beta-islet cell function.

    Preliminary data suggest that nicotinamide may prevent the onset of type 1 diabetes and prevent damage to the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas. Additional clinical research is needed before firmer conclusions can be made.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    Nicotinamide may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.

    Nicotinamide may increase the risk of bleeding, particularly in hemodialysis patients, when taken with herbs and supplements that are believed to increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba, and fewer cases with garlic and saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

    Nicotinamide may increase the amount of drowsiness caused by some herbs or supplements, such as sedatives. Caution is advised if driving or operating heavy machinery.

    Nicotinamide may lower blood pressure. Caution is advised in people taking herbs or supplements that lower blood pressure.

    Nicotinamide may interfere with the way the body processes certain herbs or supplements using the liver's cytochrome P450 enzyme system. As a result, the levels of other herbs or supplements may change in the blood. It may also alter the effects that other herbs or supplements potentially may have on the P450 system.

    Nicotinamide may also interact with antianxiety herbs and supplements, anti-inflammatory herbs and supplements, gastrointestinal herbs and supplements, herbs and supplements that may damage the liver, herbs and supplements that affect the immune system, or phosphorus.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    To reduce skin flushing as a side effect of niacin, you can use some of the newer time-released formulas, including the prescription version, Niaspan; or you can take regular over-the-counter niacin just before going to bed. Most people sleep right through the flushing reaction. Taking cholesterol-lowering agents at night is best in any case, because most of the cholesterol manufactured by the liver is produced at night. Another approach to reducing flushing is to use inositol hexaniacinate. This form of niacin has long been used in Europe to lower cholesterol levels and also to improve blood flow in intermittent claudication -- a peripheral vascular disease that is quite common in diabetics. Inositol hexaniacinate has slightly better clinical results than standard niacin, and it is much better tolerated, in terms of both flushing and -- more important -- long-term side effects. If you start out with inositol hexaniacinate and it does not work, try regular niacin. Our experience is that some people will respond only to regular niacin.

    If regular niacin or inositol hexaniacinate is being used, start with a dose of 500 mg at night before going to bed for one week. Increase the dosage to 1,000 mg the next week and to 1,500 mg the following week. Stay at 1,500 mg for two months before checking the response. Then, the dosage can be adjusted up or down, depending on the response. If you are using a time-release niacin product, such as Niaspan, start out at the full dosage of 1,500 mg at night.

    Regardless of the form of niacin being used, I strongly recommend periodic checking (at a minimum of every 3 months the first year and once yearly thereafter) of cholesterol and liver enzymes.
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    A answered
    You need to be careful, as the structure of red yeast rice is the same as a statin. Taking it with niacin can increase your risk of muscle pain and weakness. Please review your use of red yeast rice with your doctor and ask if niacin is something you should take. You may also wish to review your most recent cholesterol levels with your doctor so that you can see how well you are doing to control your cholesterol.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    If you are taking vitamin B3 on a regular basis, try to take it at the same time every day -- preferably with meals -- and at least eight ounces of cool water according to your doctor's or the label's instructions. Taking a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory like aspirin one half hour before taking B3 may reduce side effects of skin irritation and flushing. Do not take B3 with hot liquids, or you will probably experience more side effects. If you take the extended-release tablet before going to bed, take it with a snack and at least eight ounces of cool water. Be sure to swallow it without chewing, and do not break it beforehand.
     
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Vitamin B3 (niacin) supplements are available as a tablet and extended-release tablet, both of which are taken by mouth. Take a tablet each day according to your doctor's instructions with food and at least eight ounces of cool water. Do not take vitamin B3 with hot liquids because you may experience skin irritation and flushing. If you use the extended-release tablet, take it before you go to bed, with a snack and at least eight ounces of cool water. Be sure to swallow it without chewing, and do not break it beforehand.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Common side effects of nicotinamide (a form of vitamin B3) include diarrhea, headaches, itching, dizziness, upset stomach, nausea and flushing of your skin. Seek immediate medical attention if you develop an allergic reaction, such as difficulty breathing, itching, hives, rash, chest tightness and swelling of your tongue, lips, mouth and face.

    Other side effects that require immediate medical attention include bloody stool, dark urine, changes in your vision, loss of appetite, skin numbness or tingling or burning, decreased urination, muscle weakness or pain, irregular or fast heartbeat, persistent nausea, stomach pain, persistent vomiting, swelling of your hands or legs or feet, yellow eyes, yellow skin, feeling unwell, and vomit resembling coffee grounds.

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    Scientific information is lacking on the use of nicotinamide at levels greater than the recommended dietary allowance (RDA) of 17-18 milligrams in pregnant or breastfeeding women.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Always check with your doctor before taking vitamin B3, also known as niacin. You shouldn't use this drug if you have certain health conditions, such as liver disease, ulcers or allergies to nicotinic acid. If you're pregnant or breastfeeding, avoid vitamin B3 supplements unless your physician advises otherwise. If you notice any side effects from taking vitamin B3, like flushing or dizziness, discuss these with your doctor.