Are there problems associated with taking vitamin B3?

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People who have liver problems, ulcers, bleeding of any kind, or allergies to niacin, nicotinic acid or tartrazine should not use vitamin B3. Pregnant and breastfeeding women should discuss taking vitamin B3 with their doctors. Diabetics may need to talk to their doctors about increasing their doses of insulin or oral medications due to the possibility of higher blood sugar. If you are taking certain cholesterol medications (colestipol and cholestyramine), you should schedule them to be taken at least four hours apart from your vitamin B3 tablet. Even if you do not fit into the above-mentioned categories, you may experience dizziness, skin irritation or flushing. Drink cool water when taking your tablet and avoid alcohol, as it could worsen dizziness and flushing or cause liver damage. Lastly, you should talk to your doctor about any conditions you have or have had in the past-especially gout, chest pain, alcohol use, jaundice, diabetes, ulcers and any problems with your liver, kidneys, gallbladder, heart or muscles-known allergies, current medications and supplements before taking vitamin B3.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.