What should I know about cyanocobalamin before taking it?

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Cyanocobalamin may be a lifelong treatment, depending on what is causing the B12 deficiency. If you have pernicious anemia, you can expect to take this medicine regularly to avoid permanent medical problems. Your doctor may want to reconsider your dose if you become pregnant, plan to breastfeed or opt for a vegetarian or vegan diet. Tell your doctor about any changes in lifestyle or diet. People with Leber's disease, an inherited vision disorder, should not take cyanocobalamin, as it can damage their optic nerves and potentially cause blindness. Cyanocobalamin may affect people with certain infections, kidney or liver disease, iron or folic acid deficiencies or therapies affecting the bone marrow. Talk to your doctor about these or any other medical conditions you may experience. Certain drugs can interact with cyanocobalamin. These include; antibiotics; methotrexate (Rheumatrex); pyrimethamine (Daraprim); and colchicine. Excessive alcohol consumption within the past two weeks may also cause problems if you are taking cyanocobalamin. Talk to your doctor about all other drugs you are taking, as well as any vitamins, nutritional supplements or over-the-counter medications.