Should I take vitamin A if I don't have a deficiency?

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F. Michael Gloth, III
Geriatric Medicine
There is little reason to believe that vitamin A deficiency is a problem in adults in the United States or Canada. Additionally, excessive vitamin A is linked to a potential risk of reduced bone density and/or increased risk of fracture.

An article in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA) showed an increased risk of mortality and morbidity with excess vitamin A and beta-carotene. For these reasons, you should avoid vitamin A supplements, unless you have been told you are at risk of a real deficiency.
Fit at Fifty and Beyond: A Balanced Exercise and Nutrition Program (A DiaMedica Guide to Optimum Wellness)

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Fit at Fifty and Beyond: A Balanced Exercise and Nutrition Program (A DiaMedica Guide to Optimum Wellness)

As people reach their fifties, the body’s metabolism slows. Without a change in eating or exercise habits, it’s common to put on weight and become less able to perform routine physical...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.