What should I know about beta-carotene before taking it?

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Dr. Darria Long Gillespie, MD
Emergency Medicine
If you have a seizure disorder, an abnormal heart rhythm, coronary insufficiency, diabetes, or hyperthyroidism, a short-acting beta-agonist bronchodilator may not be a good option for you.

If you are pregnant, planning a pregnancy, or may be pregnant, a short-acting beta-agonist dilator may not be a good option for you. It is not known if it is safe for pregnant women.

Infants and young children can be given short-acting beta-agonist bronchodilators using a metered-dose inhaler with a spacer device or a nebulizer. The safety and effectiveness of short-acting beta-agonist bronchodilators with hydrofluoroalkane (HFA) propellant have not been established for children under 4, and the safety and effectiveness of some nebulized forms have not been established for children under 2.
 
If you are breastfeeding, a short-acting beta-agonist bronchodilator may not be a good option for you. It is not known if this drug is passed into breast milk.

This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.