Viral Oral Infections

Viral Oral Infections

Viral Oral Infections
Viral oral infections are virus that can affect the mouth and oral area. They include the herpes simplex virus, hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and in some cases, human papillomavirus or HPV. These viruses are usually very contagious and can cause painful oral sores, depending on the type of oral virus. In rare cases, mumps can spread through saliva causing swelling of the area around the mouth.

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    You're more at risk for any viral infection if you don't wash your hands. This should be a first line of defense against getting sick. If you wash your hands frequently, you have a greater chance of washing away the germs you contracted through touching objects that sick people touched. Another way you increase your risk of getting a viral oral infection is by being around or getting close to sick people with the disorder. You should definitely not come into contact with a person's mouth if you observe sores, but you should also remember that the virus may be spread by coming into contact with other areas of an infected person's body, as well as through exposing yourself to an infected person's bodily fluids.

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    The best way to prevent viral oral infections is not to come into contact with a person who has a viral disease of the mouth. Don't kiss, share drinks, or engage in oral sex with people who have sores that look like they could be symptoms of viral oral infection. In some cases, though, people can pass viral oral diseases even when the sores are not showing on their skin. For this reason, you should also make sure you're washing your hands frequently so you don't unknowingly spread the virus after touching an infected person or something that person touched.

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    On a daily basis, you can manage your viral oral infection by taking precautions against making the infection worse for you and spreading it to others.

    • Wash your hands a lot, even if you're not going to come into contact with another person. This can help you not to spread sores from your mouth to other areas of your body.
    • Use topical painkillers and home remedies to stop the pain of viral oral infection sores. This will also reduce your temptation to touch the sores, possibly spreading them.
    • Tell people that you're dealing with the infection so that you don't unknowingly spread it to another person.
    • If your doctor prescribes antiviral medications, take them immediately, even if you haven't begun to have symptoms. This will give them the best chance of working.
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    One of the most common symptoms of viral oral infections is the appearance of small sores around the mouth. Although these sores may look like they could have been caused by an injury, they are really the result of the virus. Injuries do not cause viral oral infections. Instead, viruses, which can be passed from person to person, are responsible for these sores.

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    Viral infections do not respond to antibiotics, so they are not generally used to treat viral oral infections. Instead, a type of drug called an antiviral is prescribed to those who need to reduce symptoms quickly. Antiviral medications can't cure viral infections but they can help them run their course more quickly. In addition, they might reduce severe symptoms.

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    Generally, viral oral infection treatment is not costly because many types of viral oral infections simply run their course without treatment. From time to time, however, people with viral oral infections do need treatment. However, this treatment is generally simple and consists only of some prescription drugs and creams. Only when viral oral infections become complicated or when you have an underlying condition that makes coping with the disease harder will more costly treatments, like hospital stays, be required.

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    Generally, most cases of viral oral infections are cured on their own. After several days have passed, your viral oral infection may go away unaided. Sometimes, antiviral medications are given to speed along that cure. Although these medications do not provide a cure, they can help you feel better faster. In some cases, though, no cure exists for viral oral infections, as the disease will appear over and over again throughout your life, lying dormant in your body.

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    Often, children practice worse hygiene than adults. For this reason, they've usually more likely to get viral infections of any kind. They may come into contact with viruses that other infected children have left on shared objects, and they probably don't wash their hands enough to rid themselves of these viruses. In addition, children with some types of viral oral infections are more likely to have symptoms of the virus.

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    Viruses are spread from person to person and enter the body through weak points in the body's defense system, like the mouth. Once the virus enters the body, it attacks healthy cells, which it uses to multiply. After the virus has multiplied, it begins to produce the symptoms of a viral oral infection, often small sores that are accompanied by pain or discomfort, as well as other problems, like fever.

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    There are several different kinds of viral oral infections, but the one that most people have heard about is the herpes virus. Of the two kinds of herpes simplex viruses, HSV-1 causes most viral oral infections. Another viral oral infection that most people have heard of is chickenpox, a viral infection that can cause sores in the mouth. Hand, foot, and mouth disease is another viral oral infection that is quite common.