Viral Oral Infections

Viral Oral Infections

Viral Oral Infections
Viral oral infections are virus that can affect the mouth and oral area. They include the herpes simplex virus, hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD), and in some cases, human papillomavirus or HPV. These viruses are usually very contagious and can cause painful oral sores, depending on the type of oral virus. In rare cases, mumps can spread through saliva causing swelling of the area around the mouth.

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    A , Dentist, answered

    Oral viral infections are those that have an established viral cause. Acute chickenpox, recurrent chickenpox (zoster), measles, mumps, primary herpes, recurrent herpes, and hand-foot-mouth disease are all cause by viruses and have an oral manifestation. While all of these have an acute stage which is usually associated with superficial oral ulcers or sores, chickenpox may have a recurrent form (sores known as zoster). The recurrent form of herpes only occurs on the skin-lip juncture (fever blister).

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    There are several types of viral oral infections, but the most common symptoms of the disorders, in general, are small sores around the mouth. People may also experience pain, itching, and burning on the area of the body that is affected with the sores. Some viral oral infections may also produce fever, a feeling of general sickness, and an irritated throat.

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    Viruses are spread from person to person and enter the body through weak points in the body's defense system, like the mouth. Once the virus enters the body, it attacks healthy cells, which it uses to multiply. After the virus has multiplied, it begins to produce the symptoms of a viral oral infection, often small sores that are accompanied by pain or discomfort, as well as other problems, like fever.

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    You're more at risk for any viral infection if you don't wash your hands. This should be a first line of defense against getting sick. If you wash your hands frequently, you have a greater chance of washing away the germs you contracted through touching objects that sick people touched. Another way you increase your risk of getting a viral oral infection is by being around or getting close to sick people with the disorder. You should definitely not come into contact with a person's mouth if you observe sores, but you should also remember that the virus may be spread by coming into contact with other areas of an infected person's body, as well as through exposing yourself to an infected person's bodily fluids.

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    Like other types of oral infections, doctors can generally diagnose your viral oral infection by looking at the symptoms. Different kinds of sores reflect different kinds of viral oral infections. In most cases, doctors won't need to conduct further tests, but it could be necessary if a doctor wants to make sure they have made the correct diagnosis. Doctors might order blood tests or ask for samples of skin to examine under the microscope.

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    Usually, viral oral infections clear up on their own. However, a doctor might want to prescribe antiviral medication or pain medication that can help you heal quickly and in greater comfort. Doctors might also want to give you information about avoiding the spread of your virus to others. Talk to your doctor about your symptoms if they are uncomfortable or if you need more information about the disorder.

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    Usually, doctors advise people with viral oral infections to leave the sores alone so that they can clear up on their own--canker sores and cold sores generally go away in about a week. However, antiviral medications can be prescribed if the disorder is severe enough. These medications may be given orally or as a cream. Sometimes, these medications are available in an IV. Another treatment option for viral oral infections is the home pain remedy. While both salves and pills are available to treat pain, some home remedies, like a placing something cool on the rash, can help reduce pain.

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    A , Dentist, answered

    The medications used to treat viral infections kill the virus. Some are more effective than others and once the virus has caused a sore area the area also has to heal.

    The most effective way to treat an oral virus is to treat it early before there is much damage to the tissue.

     

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    In most cases, you don't need to do anything to treat your viral oral infection. Instead, you simply need to wait for the disease to run its course. However, doctors will prescribe treatment if your viral oral infection is severe or needs to be cleared up quickly. In addition, doctors often prescribe pain relievers for people with viral oral infections. If you prefer to treat your pain from home there are some alternative treatments you can try. In some cases, you might be able to relieve some of the pain in your sores by applying a mouth spray or a cold cloth. If you have certain types of viral oral infections, you might need to prevent dehydration or treat a fever by drinking extra fluids and resting.

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    The best way to prevent viral oral infections is not to come into contact with a person who has a viral disease of the mouth. Don't kiss, share drinks, or engage in oral sex with people who have sores that look like they could be symptoms of viral oral infection. In some cases, though, people can pass viral oral diseases even when the sores are not showing on their skin. For this reason, you should also make sure you're washing your hands frequently so you don't unknowingly spread the virus after touching an infected person or something that person touched.