Viral Lung Infections

Viral Lung Infections

Viral Lung Infections
Viral lung infections include acute bronchitis, viral pneumonia, bronchiolitis, and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). These viral lung infections usually begin as a respiratory virus that spreads to the lungs. Chest pain, chronic coughing, fever and fatigue are common with bronchitis. This infection cannot be treated with antibiotics. Viral pneumonia presents with a host of symptoms including coughing, fatigue, fever, aches and pains, and GI symptoms. While antibiotics are not indicated for pneumonia, some antiviral medications can help. Infants can develop both bronchiolitis and RSV at a young age, causing coughing and wheezing.

Recently Answered

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    Yes, it is strongly advisable that you discuss your empyema symptoms with your doctor. It is a serious condition that can cause permanent lung damage and in some cases, death. However, it is very likely that a doctor will be able to help you recover completely.

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    The first step in the diagnosis of empyema is usually to take a chest x-ray. Further possible tests include a CT scan or a thoracentesis. A thoracentesis is a procedure in which some fluid in the pleural cavity (a space just outside the lungs) is removed. A Gram stain and culture of the fluid may also be used to verify and identify the bacteria involved in the infection.

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    Yes, sometimes. It is possible to prevent an empyema that is caused by a lung infection. The lung infection would need to be treated before it is allowed to develop and cause an empyema.

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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    How you can prevent RSV infection in your baby:
    • Wash your hands with soap and warm water before touching your baby, and ask others to do the same.
    • Keep people who have colds away from your baby, including brothers and sisters. Parents or other caregivers who feel ill should wear a mask and refrain from kissing the baby.
    • Don’t smoke near the baby, because exposure to tobacco smoke increases the severity of an RSV infection.
    • Avoid taking your baby to crowded locations, such as shopping malls.
    • Ask your baby’s doctor about a medication that can help prevent your baby from getting severe RSV disease.
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    A , Pediatrics, answered

    RSV (Respiratory Syncytial Virus) season will soon be upon us, a season that typically spans from late fall to early spring. This can, indeed, be a busy time for infants and young children with RSV, with kiddos presenting to doctors' offices and emergency rooms across the country with fever, cough, and difficulty breathing. Children often end up hospitalized because they have difficulty clearing secretions, maintaining good oxygen levels, and drinking enough to remain hydrated.

    The virus spreads from person to person like the common cold, by nose or mouth secretions transmitted through the air or on surfaces. Symptoms usually start a few days after exposure, with the illness usually lasting a couple of weeks at the most. RSV can be most problematic in the very young and very old, and in any patient with heart or lung disease or with a poor immune system.

    RSV spread may be curtailed by the common-sense approach often used whenever faced with the common cold. Always try to cover a sneeze or cough with a sleeve or tissue, and wash hands frequently. Clean surfaces which may be contaminated, and try not to share items like utensils or glasses. Unfortunately, there is no antibiotic for RSV or vaccine to prevent it. But, for infants born significantly premature or children less than 2 years of age with heart or lung disease, there is a monthly shot that can be given by your doctor during RSV season to potentially prevent infection.

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    Your risk of an empyema increases when other chest and lung conditions are present. These conditions include bacterial pneumonia or pus that first developed in the lungs. A chest injury or thoracic surgery could also increase your chances of getting the infection.

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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    RSV occurs in seasonal outbreaks, usually from fall to spring in most areas of the United States. However, a baby can catch RSV any time of the year.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    How RSV is spread to babies:
    • By touching, kissing, or shaking hands with an infected person
    • Through the air by sneezing or coughing
    • From countertops, used tissues, towels, sheets, blankets, or toys (because RSV can live on these things for several hours)
    • In crowded households and daycare centers
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    Yes. All of the treatments for empyema are aimed at full recovery. Once all of the pus is removed from the pleural cavity and the original cause is cured, then there should not be any more complications.

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    No, you should not be worried about empyema. If you are experiencing the symptoms, you should see a doctor and be tested for it. It is most likely that it is treatable.