Vertigo & Dizziness

Vertigo & Dizziness

Vertigo & Dizziness
Vertigo is a feeling that you are spinning or that your surroundings are spinning around you. There are two main types of vertigo. Peripheral vertigo affects the parts of the inner ear responsible for balance and perceiving motion. Central vertigo cases are linked to disorders and diseases that affect the brain or brain stem. An episode of vertigo and ringing in the ears could indicate a condition called Meniere's disease. Dizziness is a common problem that can increase with age. It may also be caused by dehydration, poor eating habits, fatigue or stress. See your doctor to rule out any concerns. Learn more about preventing and treating dizziness and vertigo with expert advice from Sharecare.

Recently Answered

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Balance problems increase as you age. About 70 percent of us experience some type of dizziness problems, and more than 2 million Americans see a doctor because of dizziness every year.
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    Subjective vertigo causes sensations that you are spinning. Dizziness is an overall feeling of lightheadedness. Dizziness, or lightheadedness, can occur on its own or along with other symptoms including vertigo, nausea, and irregular eye movements. In most cases, vertigo and dizziness are easily diagnosed and treated.

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    Vertigo and dizziness that is caused by motion sickness can sometimes be prevented. Treating ear infections, viral infections, colds, and other disorders that affect your ears, balance, and vision can help prevent vertigo and dizziness. Dizziness triggered by dehydration, poor eating habits, fatigue, or stress can also be prevented with lifestyle changes. Eating a well-balanced diet and regular exercise are the best ways to help prevent disorders and diseases that can cause vertigo and dizziness.

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    If you or your child has symptoms of vertigo and dizziness, you should talk to your doctor. It's especially important to talk to your doctor if the following symptoms occur along with your vertigo and dizziness.

    • difficulty swallowing
    • irregular eye movements
    • slurred speech
    • blurred or double vision
    • weakness in the arms and legs
    • facial paralysis
    If you or your child?s vertigo causes frequent nausea and vomiting, seek medical attention immediately to avoid the body becoming dehydrated. Fortunately, vertigo and dizziness are often easily diagnosed and treated.
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    Vertigo and dizziness caused by motion sickness or alcohol consumption can be prevented. Treating ear infections, viral infections, and colds immediately can help prevent vertigo and dizziness. Dizziness triggered by dehydration, poor eating habits, fatigue, and anxiety disorders can also be prevented with lifestyle changes and in some cases medication. Vertigo and dizziness that is linked to a disorder or disease affecting the brain is difficult to prevent.

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    Vertigo and dizziness are among the most common reasons that children and adults visit the doctor. Dizziness becomes more common in adults as they age, particularly after the age of 40. Vertigo and dizziness are common because they are linked to balance disorders which have a number of causes including motion sickness, dehydration, ear infections, and poor diet. Most cases are easily diagnosed and treated.

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    Vertigo and dizziness are not life-threatening. Complications due to vertigo and dizziness such as loss of balance and falling can cause injuries. Other symptoms, like loss of hearing can have long-term effects. To prevent complications and decrease risk of injury, the cause of your vertigo and dizziness should be diagnosed and treated.

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    In general, vertigo and dizziness do not affect children differently than adults. Dizziness, however, is more often reported in adults age 60 and over. Symptoms and complications of vertigo and dizziness can vary and depend upon the cause of each condition. For example, people who are prone to motion sickness are more prone to vertigo and dizziness. Older adults are more prone to complications from falls caused by episodes of vertigo and dizziness. All children and adults run the risk of becoming dehydrated from frequent nausea and vomiting due to vertigo, dizziness, or other illnesses.

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    The frequency and severity of your vertigo and dizziness can be caused or affected by illness. Any illness that affects your inner ears, hearing, and balance can trigger episodes of vertigo or dizziness. Illness that requires long periods of bed rest can bring about inner ear disorders such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, labyrinthitis, and Meniere's disease. Disorders and diseases that affect the brain, brain stem, or nerves that affect your balance can lead to vertigo and dizziness. Talk to your doctor about any illness you may have and its possible effects on your vertigo and dizziness.

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    There are two main types of vertigo: peripheral vertigo and central vertigo. Peripheral vertigo is caused by inner ear disorders that affect the parts of the inner ear responsible for balance and perceiving motion. Central vertigo describes cases of vertigo that are linked to disorders and diseases that affect the brain or brain stem.