What should I know about the typhoid vaccine before getting it?

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Before getting either type of typhoid vaccine, you should be aware of some of the medical conditions and medications that may interact with these vaccinations. If you're allergic to any ingredient in either type of typhoid vaccine, or if you've had a severe reaction to it in the past, you should not get it. You should not get the live typhoid vaccine (the type that's taken by mouth) if your immune system is weakened for any reason. This includes people with HIV, AIDS or cancer, and people who are being treated with radiation or chemotherapy or who are taking corticosteroids or other drugs that affect the immune system. You also should not take the live typhoid vaccine within 24 hours of taking certain antibiotics. Children under six years of age should not get the live typhoid vaccine, and children younger than two years of age should not get the inactive typhoid vaccine (the type that's injected). Women who are pregnant or breastfeeding should talk to their doctor before getting either type of typhoid vaccine. Certain medications may interact with the typhoid vaccine. Before getting either type of typhoid vaccine, tell your doctor about any medications and supplements you're taking, especially immunosuppressants, sulfonamides, antibiotics, corticosteroids and proguanil (an antimalarial drug). It's important to remember that typhoid vaccines are useful in preventing typhoid fever, but they're not 100% effective. When traveling, you should still be very careful about what you eat and drink to avoid getting infected.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.