A Pox on Your Clubhouse
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A Pox on Your Clubhouse

In early September, the Kansas City Royals were leading their MLB division. Then a pox landed on their clubhouse; chickenpox, that is. Star relief pitcher Kelvin Herrera and right fielder Alex Rios came down with the disease. They’re from the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, respectively, where vaccines and chickenpox as a childhood disease are not common.

In this country, where the chickenpox vaccine was added to the childhood immunization schedule in 1995 (the booster in 2006) chickenpox is pretty rare. But chickenpox is a highly contagious disease and players come in constant contact with other players, coaches, reporters and fans -- who may be immune because they’ve had CP or been inoculated…or not.

When an adult gets the chickenpox, severe complications can follow. They include: bacterial infections of the skin, soft tissues, bones, joints, or bloodstream; pneumonia; toxic shock syndrome; Reye's syndrome if you’re taking aspirin; and encephalitis (dysfunction of the brain often follows, as does a decrease in coordination). Dr. Steven Gordon, chairman of the Department of Infectious Diseases at Dr. Mike’s Cleveland Clinic told CBS News, chickenpox “can be more severe in adults, but it's especially a concern for pregnant women. The fatality rate can be quite high."

Vaccines & Immunizations

Vaccines & Immunizations

Vaccines are commonly given to children in the form of a shot to help prevent serious diseases like measles and mumps. Vaccines are developed using either dead strains of a disease, weakened strains, or strains of a different dise...

ase. As adults, we receive flu vaccines or may need a booster of childhood vaccines to retain immunity. Travelers may receive vaccines either as a condition of entry to a country, or on recommendation of health officials. Generally there is little or no reaction to a vaccine, but in some cases the vaccine may cause an allergic reaction or a temporary, mild illness. Some vaccines are not safe for pregnant women, so it’s important to check with a healthcare professional.
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