How does stress contribute to urinary incontinence?

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Jill Rabin
OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology)
Although many of us tend to pooh-pooh them, emotional problems such as anxiety, confusion, depression, nervousness, or stress can lead to or aggravate already existing bladder problems and incontinence. As far-fetched as it may sound, it is essential to keep a clear, sound mind to maintain good bladder function. Anxiety, confusion, depression, nervousness, or stress can change your bladder habits and make you unaware of your bladder needs. Messages between your nervous system, your urinary tract muscles, and your brain must coordinate properly if you are to stay continent. So one of the keys to staying dry is maintaining good mental health.
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Urinary Incontinence

Urinary Incontinence

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.