Urinary Incontinence

Recently Answered

  • 2 Answers
    A
    A answered
    Your doctor may recommend one or more of the following tests to help determine what's causing your urinary incontinence. All of these tests can be done in the doctor's office and do not require surgery.
    • Urinalysis: A sample of your urine will be analyzed for bacteria, blood, or other abnormalities. Some analyses can be done right away, such as testing for bacteria, but some will take a couple of days for the results to come back from the lab.
    • Post-void Residual Measurement: If you have the urge to urinate frequently but don't void much fluid, your doctor might recommend a post void residual measurement test to see if you are emptying your bladder completely. To do this, you will urinate, and then your doctor will insert a small, soft tube (catheter) into the bladder through the urethra to drain any remaining urine. Alternatively, your doctor might use an abdominal ultrasound to get an image of your bladder and the amount of fluid in it.
    • Ultrasound: Your doctor may do an ultrasound to check for abnormal growths and to view and measure the size and shape of your kidneys and bladder. In men, the prostate will also be viewed.
    • Cystoscopy: Depending on your condition, your doctor might need to look at the inside of your bladder. To do this, a thin telescope-like instrument called a cystoscope is inserted into your bladder through the urethra.
    • Stress Test: A stress test measures how well your bladder and sphincter muscles are functioning. A typical stress test involves being x-rayed while urinating, coughing, or straining in order to see how your bladder reacts to these activities.

      See All 2 Answers
    • 2 Answers
      A
      A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered

      A pad test may be used to measure leakage and may be performed in the specialist’s office or at home. Pad testing can be done over a period of time as short as twenty minutes or up to one hour.

      A sanitary napkin is weighed and then worn for twenty to sixty minutes, during which time the individual is asked to perform certain activities which may include:

      • Walking briskly for three minutes

      • Sitting and then standing ten to twenty times

      • Walking up and down stairs for one to two minutes

      • Picking up objects from the floor five to ten times

      • Coughing twelve times (at various strengths; may be repeated)

      • Running in place for one minute (may be repeated)

      The pad is then removed and weighed again to calculate the amount of urine voided. A small loss may indicate stress incontinence (for example), while a greater loss may indicate unstable bladder contractions usually associated with the urge symptoms.

      Coloring agents may also be used to determine that the fluid lost is urine. This is called a dye test and is performed after a non-toxic dye is placed in the bladder. Any stain of dye on the pad following the test indicates that urine was lost during the test.

      See All 2 Answers
    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
      Detrusor instability refers to an unstable bladder, one in which the detrusor muscle (the muscle responsible for contracting the bladder so that urine can be voided) contracts involuntarily and for no apparent reason. This is associated with symptoms such as urge to void and urinary frequency (voiding more often than is considered the norm).
    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
      While you are on the examining table, body reclined - with your legs up in stirrups - a Q-Tip lubricated with anesthetic gel is inserted into your urethra (the opening to your bladder). Don’t worry. It doesn’t hurt. You are then asked to cough and strain, and the doctor will observe how the cotton swab reacts. Too much movement of the Q-Tip may be indicative of weak pelvic floor and urethral connective tissue, which may place a woman at risk for incontinence.
    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
      You will be asked to come to the office with a full bladder and asked to cough in an upright and supine (lying-down) position. Then you may be asked to empty your bladder. This urine may be sent for various tests. You will also be asked to repeat this coughing maneuver with an empty bladder. If you lose urine with either a full or empty bladder, the diagnosis may be stress incontinence.
    • 3 Answers
      A
      A , Gynecology, answered
      Many doctors who diagnose patients with urinary problems have a urodynamic testing lab outfitted with a special chair and computer equipment that can help obtain measurements of urinary pressure and flow. If your condition is not easily diagnosed by a physical exam and a discussion of your symptoms, or if the strategy your doctor recommends does not improve your incontinence, your doctor may suggest urodynamic testing to administer a series of specialized tests that help evaluate your urinary system in action. It is available for both men and women.
      See All 3 Answers
    • 2 Answers
      A
      A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered

      Intrinsic sphincter deficiency (ISD) is a less common form of stress incontinence and may happen after pelvic surgery, an anti-incontinence procedure, a vaginal birth, or in conjunction with a neurological problem. Something malfunctions in the urethra and causes it to refuse to stay tightly closed.

      Do you know what a Chinese finger puzzle is? It’s a woven tube of straw. You put a finger into each end of the tube, and if you pull simultaneously on your fingers, they get stuck.

      Just as with the puzzle, imagine that the urethra is closed shut by its sphincter, or closing muscle. The bladder may be well anchored, the pelvic muscles and connective tissue may support all of the pelvic organs, and yet, when this muscle (sphincter) doesn’t work, the urethra doesn’t close properly. Leakage occurs as a result of this, because the pressure in the bladder is then greater than the pressure in the urethra.

      See All 2 Answers
    • 3 Answers
      A
      A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
      There are two different kinds of urinary incontinence: urge incontinence and stress incontinence. Some people have both types. Stress urinary incontinence is the kind people probably think about the most, which is when you leak urine after coughing, sneezing or laughing. There are surgical treatments for this condition, as well as some behavioral treatments.
      See All 3 Answers
    • 6 Answers
      A
      Stress urinary incontinence may not affect the body much physically beyond the uncontrollable urge to urinate. Perhaps more so than physically, stress urinary incontinence can also affect a person's quality of life and well-being.
      See All 6 Answers
    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered

      There are a number of facts you should know about stress incontinence:

      • Forty to fifty percent of women with incontinence problems suffer from
        stress incontinence.

      • Stress incontinence is caused by weakness of the pelvic muscles, the
        connective tissues, and/or nerves controlling the pelvic floor or the
        urethral sphincter. Leakage of urine occurs when abdominal pressure is
        increased by activities such as coughing, jumping, and laughing and/or
        when the urethra must close but doesn’t.

      • Noninvasive, risk-free exercises can help reduce the severity of leakage
        in the majority of women who suffer from stress incontinence.

      • Medication is not a preferred method of treatment.

      • A wide range of surgical procedures are available to treat stress
        incontinence.