Urinary Incontinence

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Urology, answered
    The loss of urine during sexual intercourse is not normal. It could represent a symptom of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). If the pelvic floor muscles have become weak (for example due to childbirths, aging), then the intra-abdominal pressure generated during intercourse will be unequally distributed to the bladder and urethra thus causing a net transfer of urine out of the urinary bladder.
    The loss of urine during intercourse can lead to embarrassment and even female sexual dysfunction.  Many women experience minor leakage of urine from time to time. Emptying the bladder or cutting back on fluids prior to intercourse can be helpful. If loss of urine during intercourse is a frequent occurrence, contact your doctor or healthcare provider for a full discussion of possible treatment options for SUI. 
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    When you sneeze, cough, or lift the overweight suitcase stuffed with tchotchkes from your latest vacation, the pressure inside your abdomen can increase, forcing urine out. It comes about because the muscles in your pelvic floor that normally support your bladder like a perfectly designed crutch have weakened to the point where they can’t contract well or fast enough to hold back the urine. Sometimes just a drop will leak out and sometimes it will be enough to wish you were at home.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    day1-west-hills-safir-2
    There are various surgical procedures that can alleviate leakage. In this video, urologist Michael Safir, MD, of West Hills Hospital, describes one type of procedure that takes about 30 minutes and one incision.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Family Medicine, answered

    Many issues can cause bladder control problems in older women. In addition to smoking, drinking alcohol or caffeinated beverages, and normally weakened pelvic muscles, there are very serious issues that can contribute to urinary incontinence. Cardiovascular disease, mobility problems, depression, infections, nerve damage from diabetes or stroke, depression, and weight gain can all affect bladder control.

  • 3 Answers
    A
    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
    Urinary Incontinence (UI), as defined by the International Continence Society, is “the complaint of any involuntary leakage of urine.” Girls, the sad but true fact is that incontinence primarily strikes women. So why does this happen to us? Unfortunately, our pelvic anatomy works against us. Women are susceptible to bladder infections, also known as urinary tract infections (UTIs) or cystitis. Bacteria can easily enter women’s bladders because our vagina, urethra, and anus are close together and because our short urethras make it easier for germs to travel where they shouldn’t go.
    See All 3 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered

    You might expect some leakage during pregnancy as the uterus enlarges and puts increased pressure on the bladder. Why? The bladder and pelvis undergo changes during pregnancy to accommodate the growing fetus and the mother. The bladder may not empty as well because of pressure from the enlarging uterus or fetus, which may lead to an increase in the amount of urine left in the bladder after urinating. This remaining urine may be the perfect environment for bacterial growth, which may cause the increased occurrence of urinary tract infections during pregnancy. There is also an increase in the amount of urine produced by the kidneys. As a result, pregnant women have to urinate more frequently.

    Several hormones produced during pregnancy (especially estrogen and progesterone) cause relaxation in pelvic tissues and organs, including the bladder and ureters (tubes leading from the kidneys to the bladder). This relaxation is helpful because it allows the pelvis to become more flexible and to make room for that baby; however, it may also lead to incomplete bladder emptying and urinary tract infections (UTIs). In addition to this, pregnancy and delivery may also cause nerve damage to the pelvic muscles, which may not heal completely and which may cause subsequent problems.

  • 3 Answers
    A
    A Urology, answered on behalf of
    Doctors diagnose urinary incontinence beginning with a history and a physical exam. They also do a urinalysis to check for infection. When you have an infection, bacteria can cause damage to the lining of the bladder and urethra, which causes irritation - the urge to go. If you have the urge to go, it may not be overactive bladder at all, but rather an infection that has not been diagnosed and can be treated with antibiotics. Depending on the results of the first examination and urinalysis, your doctor may perform further tests.
    See All 3 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Gynecology, answered
    When you are considering any type of pelvic or abdominal surgery, such as a hysterectomy, prostate removal, or treatment for hemorrhoids (painful swellings in the anus) or anal fistula (a painful crack or slit in the anus), ask about the risk for subsequent incontinence for the proposed procedure and its alternatives. For example, prostate removal may result in urinary stress incontinence (an estimated 14% of men still have frequent urine leakage five years after the procedure), but alternative treatment with radiation seed therapy may cause urge incontinence, and external beam radiation can lead to bowel problems, including fecal incontinence (unintended passage of stool). When a medication is prescribed, inquire about incontinence as a possible side effect and whether alternatives are available if symptoms occur.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A answered
    You may be more likely to experience urinary incontinence if you:
    • Are significantly overweight or obese
    • Smoke
    • Are pregnant or have carried a pregnancy to term
    • Are postmenopausal
    • Are age 60 or older
    • Have frequent bladder infections
    • Have an enlarged prostate or a family history of prostate trouble
    • Have had pelvic surgery or injury
    • Have a condition that might cause nerve or muscle damage
    • Have had a stroke

      See All 2 Answers
    • 1 Answer
      A
      A , OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered
      Think about the amount of pressure you put on your bladder when you strain and push to have a bowel movement. Preventing constipation by eating high-fiber foods and drinking plenty of water may help prevent incontinence. In a study of a group of women who experienced fecal incontinence, a positive association was seen between urinary incontinence and constipation.