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How does fulminant colitis affect the body?

Dr. Jeanne Morrison, PhD
Family Practitioner

Fulminant colitis is a dangerous and life-threatening illness. It impacts the entire colon and causes severe pain, diarrhea, dehydration, and even shock. Fever; blood, pus, or mucus in the stool; an unusually high number of bowel movements (10 to 20 per day); and an urgent need to defecate all may accompany severe colitis. Abdominal cramps, loss of appetite, and weight loss also may occur. Fulminant colitis can lead to a ruptured intestine or colon, which can be deadly. Toxic megacolon also may occur, which happens when the colon becomes distended (abnormally swollen or stretched due to internal pressure).

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.